Contents


The Case for Judas, Continued

Reading Judas: The Gospel of Judas and the Shaping of Christianity by Elaine Pagels and Karen L. King

The Lost Gospel of Judas Iscariot: A New Look at Betrayer and Betrayed by Bart D. Ehrman

The Girl in the Tower

Petrosinella: A Neapolitan Rapunzel retold and illustrated by Diane Stanley

Golden: A Retelling of “Rapunzel” by Cameron Dokey

Letters from Rapunzel by Sara Lewis Holmes

Rapunzel by Barbara Rogasky, illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman

Zel by Donna Jo Napoli

The Tower Room by Adèle Geras

Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel by Patricia Storace, illustrated by Raúl Colón

Rapunzel: A Groovy Fairy Tale by Lynn Roberts, illustrated by David Roberts

Barbie as Rapunzel by Merry North

Move Closer, Please’

The Art of the American Snapshot, 1888–1978: From the Collection of Robert E. Jackson an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., October 7–December 31, 2007, and the Amon Carter Museum, Forth Worth, Texas, February 16–April 27, 2008.

Praying with the Founders

Ten Tortured Words: How the Founding Fathers Tried to Protect Religion in America…and What’s Happened Since by Stephen Mansfield

So Help Me God: The Founding Fathers and the First Great Battle over Church and State by Forrest Church

Contributors

Hussein Agha is Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and coauthor of A Framework for a Palestinian National Security Doctrine. (November 2012)

Harold W. Attridge is Dean of Yale Divinity School and Lillian Claus Professor of New Testament. His books include Hebrews: A Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews and Nag Hammadi Codex I: The Jung Codex. (May 2008)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

Caleb Crain is the author of American Sympathy, a study of friendship between men in early American literature. He has written for The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and n+1. His novel Necessary Errors will be published in 2013.

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (October 2014)

Tim Flannery is a founding member of the Climate Council and 
former Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His most recent book is Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific. (August 2014)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Alison Lurie is Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of two collections of essays on children’s literature, Don’t Tell the Grownups and Boys and Girls Forever, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.


Robert Malley is Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group. He is writing here in his personal capacity. (November 2012)

Joyce Carol Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Professor in the Lewis Arts Center at Princeton. Her newest story ­collection is Lovely, Dark, Deep.


Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory.

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.