Contents


The Illusions of Psychiatry

The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth by Irving Kirsch

Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America by Robert Whitaker

Unhinged: The Trouble with Psychiatry—A Doctor’s Revelations About a Profession in Crisis by Daniel Carlat

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) by American Psychiatric Association

What Drove the Terrible War?

A World on Fire: Britain’s Crucial Role in the American Civil War by Amanda Foreman

The Union War by Gary W. Gallagher

1861: The Civil War Awakening by Adam Goodheart

America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation by David Goldfield

God’s Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War by George C. Rable

The Visions of Ann Beattie

The New Yorker Stories by Ann Beattie

Distortions by Ann Beattie

Chilly Scenes of Winter by Ann Beattie

Secrets and Surprises by Ann Beattie

The Burning House by Ann Beattie

Park City: New and Selected Stories by Ann Beattie

Perfect Recall by Ann Beattie

Making Fun of the Stories We Know

Seven Years by Peter Stamm, translated from the German by Michael Hofmann

On a Day Like This by Peter Stamm, translated from the German by Michael Hofmann

Unformed Landscape by Peter Stamm, translated from the German by Michael Hofmann

Contributors

Marcia Angell is a Senior Lecturer in Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and former Editor in Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine.

 
(March 2014)

Julian Bell is a painter and writer living in Lewes, England. His Van Gogh: A Power Seething will be published early next year.
 (June 2014)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. His two new books, The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke: From the Sublime and Beautiful to American Independence and Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, were published earlier this year. (August 2014)

David Dollenmayer is Emeritus Professor of German at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.
 (June 2013)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Deborah Eisenberg is the author of four collections of short stories and a play, Pastorale.
 She is the winner of the 2000 Rea Award for the Short Story, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Lannan Foundation Fellowship, and five O. Henry Awards. The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg won the 2011 PEN/Faulkner Award. She lives in New York City.

Yasmine El Rashidi is the author of The Battle for Egypt: Dispatches from the Revolution, and a contributing editor to the Middle East arts and culture quarterly Bidoun. She lives in Cairo.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and ­Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (October 2014)

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most recently, War on the Waters: The Union and Confederate Navies, 1861–1865.


Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His most recent book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive ­Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


Meghan O’Rourke, a former editor at The New Yorker and Slate, is the author of the poetry collections Once and Halflife and a memoir, The Long Goodbye. Her poetry and essays have appeared in The New York Times, The New Republic, The New York Review of Books, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of the inaugural May Sarton Poetry Prize, and teaches at NYU and Princeton.

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan and the author of the travelogue Italian Ways. His latest novel is Sex Is Forbidden.


Sarah Plimpton is a poet and artist working in several media, including oil painting, printmaking, and artists’ books. Her artwork is in such public collections as the New York Public Library and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
 (July 2011)

Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer 
at Bard. Her new novel is Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932.

Willibald Sauerländer is a former Director of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich. His latest book is Manet malt Monet: Ein Sommer in Argenteuil. (June 2013)

Cathleen Schine is the author of several novels, including Rameau’s Niece, The Love Letter, She is Me, The New Yorkers, and The Three Weissmanns of Westport. Her latest novel, Fin & Lady, was published in July 2013. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

David Shulman is the Renee Lang Professor of Humanistic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an activist in Ta’ayush, Arab-Jewish Partnership. His latest book is More Than Real: A History of the Imagination in South India.
 (May 2014)

Adam Thirlwell is the author of two novels, Politics and The Escape; a novella, Kapow!; an essay-book, The Delighted States, winner of a Somerset Maugham Award; and a compendium of translations edited for McSweeney’s. He has twice been selected as one of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists. His new novel, Lurid & Cute, will be published in 2015.

Robin Wells is the coauthor, along with Paul Krugman, of Economics and has taught economics at Princeton, Stanford Business School, and MIT.
 (July 2012)

Edmund White has written biographies of Jean Genet, Marcel Proust, and Arthur Rimbaud. He has also written several novels; the most recent is Jack Holmes and His Friend: A Novel. He teaches creative writing at Princeton. His latest book, States of Desire Revisited: Travels in Gay America, has just been published.