Contents


The Great Transition

Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition (7th–9th Century) an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, March 14–July 8, 2012

The Art of the Classic Loner

“My painting is tomorrow’s painting. Watch and see.”—Forrest Bess an exhibition at Christie’s, New York City, March 1–April 11, 2012

The Man That Got Away an installation at the Whitney Biennial, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City, March 1–May 27, 2012

The White Plight

Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960–2010 by Charles Murray

The Great Divergence: America’s Growing Inequality Crisis and What We Can Do About It by Timothy Noah

The Master of Bigness

OMA/Progress an exhibition at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, October 6, 2011–February 19, 2012

Project Japan: Metabolism Talks… by Rem Koolhaas and Hans Ulrich Obrist, edited by Kayoko Ota and James Westcott

Obsessed with Scapegoats and Outcasts

The Complete Plays of Sophocles: A New Translation by Robert Bagg and James Scully

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, translated from the Greek with an introduction and notes by David Mulroy

An Introduction to Greek Tragedy by Ruth Scodel

Theater of the People: Spectators and Society in Ancient Athens by David Kawalko Roselli

Contributors

Margaret Atwood is the author of more than forty books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays, including the 2000 Booker Prize–winning The Blind Assassin; Alias Grace, which won the Giller Prize and the Premio Mondello; The Robber Bride, Cat’s Eye, The Handmaid’s Tale, and The Penelopiad. Her latest work is a book of short stories called Stone Mattress: Nine Tales (2014). Her newest novel, Madd­Addam (2013) is the third in a trilogy comprising The Year of the Flood (2009) and the Giller and Booker Prize–nominated Oryx and Crake (2003). Atwood lives in Toronto with the writer Graeme Gibson.

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Augustine of Hippo: A Biography and, most recently, Treasure in Heaven: The Holy Poor in Early Christianity. (October 2017)

Michael Dirda is a columnist for The Washington Post Book World. His most recent book is Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books.
 (December 2016)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Martin Filler is the 2017 recipient of the Stephen A. Kliment ­Oculus Award, given by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, for his architecture criticism, which has appeared in these pages since 1985.
 (August 2017)

Mark Ford’s latest book is Thomas Hardy: Half a Londoner. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (October 2017)

Peter Green is Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin and Adjunct Professor at the University of Iowa. His books include The Hellenistic Age: A Short History and a translation of the Iliad. His translation of the Odyssey is forthcoming. (October 2017)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth and Other STEM ­Delusions, will appear next March.
 (July 2015)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. He has ­reported for The New York Review from, among other places, ­Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.
 (May 2017)

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair at the University of California at Riverside. His recent books include An Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and a translation of the memoirs of the Chinese astrophysicist Fang Lizhi, entitled The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State. (November 2016)

Claire Messud’s most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. (March 2017)

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and William Nicholson. (October 2017)

Christine Smallwood, a doctoral candidate in English at Columbia, has written for Bookforum, Harper’s, the London Review of Books, n+1, The Nation, and other publications.
 (May 2012)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (November 2017)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is the novel House of Names. (July 2017)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)