Contents


The Great Transition

Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition (7th–9th Century) an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, March 14–July 8, 2012

The Art of the Classic Loner

“My painting is tomorrow’s painting. Watch and see.”—Forrest Bess an exhibition at Christie’s, New York City, March 1–April 11, 2012

The Man That Got Away an installation at the Whitney Biennial, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City, March 1–May 27, 2012

The White Plight

Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960–2010 by Charles Murray

The Great Divergence: America’s Growing Inequality Crisis and What We Can Do About It by Timothy Noah

The Master of Bigness

OMA/Progress an exhibition at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, October 6, 2011–February 19, 2012

Project Japan: Metabolism Talks… by Rem Koolhaas and Hans Ulrich Obrist, edited by Kayoko Ota and James Westcott

Obsessed with Scapegoats and Outcasts

The Complete Plays of Sophocles: A New Translation by Robert Bagg and James Scully

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, translated from the Greek with an introduction and notes by David Mulroy

An Introduction to Greek Tragedy by Ruth Scodel

Theater of the People: Spectators and Society in Ancient Athens by David Kawalko Roselli

Contributors

Margaret Atwood is the author of The Handmaid’s Tale, Oryx and Crake, and The Blind Assassin, among other novels. Her new novel, MaddAddam, was published in September. (November 2013)

Peter Brown is Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His most recent book is Through the Eye of a Needle: Wealth, the Fall of Rome, and the Making of Christianity in the West, 350–550 AD. (December 2013)

Michael Dirda, a weekly book columnist for The Washington Post, received the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. He is the author of the memoir An Open Book and of four collections of essays: Readings, Bound to Please, Book by Book, and Classics for Pleasure. His most recent book, On Conan Doyle, received a 2012 Edgar Award for best critical/biographical work of the year.
 Dirda graduated with Highest Honors in English from Oberlin College and earned a Ph.D. in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. He is a contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, the online Barnes & Noble Review, and several other periodicals, as well as a frequent lecturer and an occasional college teacher.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Mark Ford’s Selected Poems will be published in April. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (February 2014)

Peter Green is Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin and Adjunct Professor at the University of Iowa. His most recent book is The Hellenistic Age: A Short History. (April 2014)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics 
at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth, will appear in the spring. (October 2014)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. For The New York Review he has reported from, among other places, Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair for Teaching Across Disciplines at the University of California at Riverside. He translated China’s Charter 08 manifesto, published in these pages, and recently 
co-edited No Enemies, No Hatred, a collection of essays and poems by Liu Xiaobo. His latest book isAn Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and he is finishing a translation of the autobiography of the Chinese dissident astrophysicist Fang Lizhi.

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China and was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London.
 (July 2014)

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

Christine Smallwood, a doctoral candidate in English at Columbia, has written for Bookforum, Harper’s, the London Review of Books, n+1, The Nation, and other publications.
 (May 2012)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and author of the e-book Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Beatles and America, Then and Now.
 (June 2014)

Colm Tóibín is the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is The Testament of Mary.


Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book for general readers is Lake Views: This World and the Universe.

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.