Contents


On the Target

Laura Poitras: Astro Noise

Astro Noise: A Survival Guide for Living Under Total Surveillance by Laura Poitras and others

Israel: The Broken Silence

Popular Protest in Palestine: The Uncertain Future of Unarmed Resistance by Marwan Darweish and Andrew Rigby

Return: A Palestinian Memoir by Ghada Karmi

Disturbing the Peace: The Use of Criminal Law to Limit the Actions of Human Rights Defenders in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories by the Human Rights Defenders Fund

Al pi tehom [At the Edge of the Abyss] by Talia Sasson

The Conflict Shoreline: Colonization as Climate Change in the Negev Desert by Eyal Weizman and Fazal Sheikh

This Place

Hillary & Women

Broad Influence: How Women Are Changing the Way America Works by Jay Newton-Small

My Turn: Hillary Clinton Targets the Presidency by Doug Henwood

Brilliant, Troubled Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker: Complete Broadway, 1918–1923 edited by Kevin C. Fitzpatrick

Complete Stories by Dorothy Parker, edited by Colleen Breese, with an introduction by Regina Barreca

Complete Poems by Dorothy Parker, edited by Marion Meade

Dorothy Parker: In Her Own Words edited by Barry Day

Dorothy Parker: What Fresh Hell Is This? by Marion Meade

The Portable Dorothy Parker edited and with an introduction by Marion Meade

Constant Reader by Dorothy Parker

You Might as Well Live: The Life and Times of Dorothy Parker by John Keats

The Cops and Race and Gangs—and Murder

Vigilance: My Life Serving America and Protecting Its Empire City by Ray Kelly

Blue: The LAPD and the Battle to Redeem American Policing by Joe Domanick

Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America by Jill Leovy

How the Lobbyists Win in Washington

The Business of America Is Lobbying: How Corporations Became Politicized and Politics Became More Corporate by Lee Drutman

The Influence Machine: The US Chamber of Commerce and the Corporate Capture of American Life by Alyssa Katz

Mysterious, Brilliant Frederick Douglass

The Lives of Frederick Douglass by Robert S. Levine

Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century’s Most Photographed American by John Stauffer, Zoe Trodd, and Celeste-Marie Bernier

The Victory of Ukraine

The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine by Serhii Plokhy

“Tell Them We Are Starving”: The 1933 Soviet Diaries of Gareth Jones edited by Lubomyr Y. Luciuk, with an introduction by Ray Gamache

Gareth Jones: Eyewitness to the Holodomor by Ray Gamache

If Mao Had Been a Hermit

The Big Red Book of Modern Chinese Literature: Writings from the Mainland in the Long Twentieth Century edited by Yunte Huang

Dragon in Ambush: The Art of War in the Poems of Mao Zedong by Jeremy Ingalls, compiled and edited by Allen Wittenborn

Inside Obedient Islamic Minds

The New Threat: The Past, Present, and Future of Islamic Militancy by Jason Burke

The Making of Salafism: Islamic Reform in the Twentieth Century by Henri Lauzière

Inside the Brotherhood by Hazem Kandil

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and a Professor of Practice at the London School of Economics’ Institute of Global Affairs. Her new book, Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, will be published in October. (October 2017)

Sven Birkerts is Director of the Bennington College Writing Seminars and Editor of AGNI. His book Changing the Subject: Art and Attention in the Internet Age was published last year.
 (April 2016)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, was recently published in paperback. (October 2017)

Ian Buruma will be the new editor of The New York Review of Books in September 2017. He has been a frequent contributor to the Review since 1985. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

C.M. Clark is Regius Professor of History at Cambridge. His books include The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 and Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600–1947. (April 2016)

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. (September 2017)

Andrew Delbanco is Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia.
 (November 2016)

Denis Donoghue is Emeritus University Professor of English and American Letters at NYU. (April 2016)

Deborah Eisenberg is the author of four collections of short stories and a play, Pastorale. (April 2016)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His most recent book is the memoir Avid Reader: A Life. (June 2017)

Zoë Heller is the author of Everything You Know, Notes on a Scandal, and The Believers. (August 2017)

Martha Howell is Miriam Champion Professor of History at Columbia. Her books include Commerce Before Capitalism in Europe, 1300–1600 and The Marriage Exchange: Property, Social Place and Gender in Cities of the Low Countries, 1300–1550.
 (April 2016)

Michael Kimmelman is a longtime critic for The New York Times. A version of his essay in this issue will appear in the collection City Squares: Eighteen Writers on the Spirit and Significance of Squares Around the World, edited by Catie Marron and published in April by Harper.
 (April 2016)

Nicholas D. Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times. His most recent book, with his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, is A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity.
 (April 2016)

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair at the University of California at Riverside. His recent books include An Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and a translation of the memoirs of the Chinese astrophysicist Fang Lizhi, entitled The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State. (November 2016)

Alison Lurie is the Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of ten novels, two collections of essays on children’s literature, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent book is Reading for Fun. (March 2017)

Jeff Madrick is the Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative at the Century Foundation and Editor of Challenge. His most recent book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Damaged America and the World.
 (June 2017)

David Rieff is the author of At the Point of a Gun: Democratic Dreams and Armed Intervention and, most recently, The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice and Money in the Twenty-First Century. His new book, In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and Its Ironies, will be published in May. (April 2016)

Malise Ruthven’s books include Islam in the World, Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning, and Encounters with Islam: On Religion, Politics and Modernity. (June 2017)

Luc Sante teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard. His latest book is The Other Paris. (October 2017)

Michael Scammell is the author of biographies of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Arthur Koestler, and has translated many books from Russian. He is now working on a memoir. (April 2016)

Tamsin Shaw is Associate Professor of European and ­Mediterranean Studies and Philosophy at NYU and the author of ­Nietzsche’s Political Skepticism.
 (April 2017)

David Shulman is Professor Emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an activist in Ta’ayush, Arab–Jewish Partnership. He was awarded the Israel Prize for Religious Studies in February. (June 2017)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is the novel House of Names. (July 2017)

Robert Winter is Distinguished Professor of Music and holds the Presidential Chair in Music and Interactive Arts at UCLA. He is about to release Music in the Air, the first all-digital history of Western music.(April 2016)