Contents


The Third Indochina War

Communist Party Power in Kampuchea (Cambodia): Documents and Discussion Studies, Cornell University compiled and edited with an introduction by Timothy Michael Carney

Murder of a Gentle Land: The Untold Story of Communist Genocide in Cambodia by John Barron and Anthony Paul

Cambodia: Starvation and Revolution by George C. Hildebrand and Gareth Porter

Artist of Nightmare

Andrei Bely: His Life and Works by Konstantin Mochulsky, translated by Nora Szalavitz

Petersburg by Andrei Bely, translated, annotated, and introduced by Robert A. Maguire and John E. Malmstad

TV Guide

Television: The First Fifty Years by Jeff Greenfield

Remote Control by Frank Mankiewicz and Joel Swerdlow

The Sponsor: Notes on a Modern Potentate by Erik Barnouw

Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television by Jerry Mander

Contributors

Bernard Avishai teaches political economy at Dartmouth College and business at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and is the author of The Tragedy of Zionism, among other books. He was made a Guggenheim fellow in 1987.

Hillel Halkin is a critic, writer, and translator of both Hebrew and Yiddish. Born in America in 1939, Halkin studied English literature at Columbia University and emigrated to Israel in 1950. His 2010 biography of Yahuda Halevi won the National Jewish Book Prize.

Stuart Hampshire (1914–2004) was an English philosopher. He taught at University College London, Princeton, Stanford and Oxford, where he was named Warden of Wadham College. His books include Thought and Action, Spinoza and Justice Is Conflict.

Christopher Hill (1912–2003) was an English historian. Educated at Oxford, Hill taught at the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire as well as Oxford, where he was elected Master of Balliol College. His books include Puritanism and Revolution,Intellectual Origins of the English Revolution, and The World Turned Upside Down.

Irving Howe (1920–1993) was an American literary and social critic. His history of Eastern-European Jews in America, World of Our Fathers, won the 1977 National Book Award in History.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Karl Miller is a British editor and critic. In 1979 he founded the London Review of Books.

William Shawcross is the author of several books on Cambodia. (December 1996)

Garry Wills most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (April 2019)

James Wolcott is a columnist for Vanity Fair. (October 2018)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His most recent book is On Empson.