Contents


The Two Solzhenitsyns

The Oak and the Calf: Sketches of Literary Life in the Soviet Union by Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, translated by Harry Willetts

The Iranian Revolution

Iran: From Religious Dispute to Revolution by Michael M.J. Fischer

The Rise and Fall of the Shah by Amin Saikal

The Fall of the Shah by Fereydoun Hoveyda, translated by Roger Liddell

Rats or Cheese?

Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth-Century Tuscany by Carlo M. Cipolla, translated by Muriel Kittel

The Cheese and the Worms: The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller by Carlo Ginzburg, translated by John Tedeschi and Anne Tedeschi

The Poets’ Greece

Twenty Contemporary Greek Poets edited by Dino Siotis and John Chioles

The Sovereign Sun: Selected Poems by Odysseus Elytis, translated by Kimon Friar

The Axion Esti by Odysseus Elytis, translated by Edmund Keeley and George Savidis

Angelos Sikelianos: Selected Poems translated by Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard

Poems by George Seféris, translated by Rex Warner

Scripture of the Blind by Yannis Ritsos, translated by Kimon Friar and Kostas Myrsiades

Ritsos in Parentheses translated by Edmund Keeley

The Fourth Dimension: Selected Poems of Yannis Ritsos translated by Rae Dalven

Contributors

Robert M. Adams (1915-1996) was a founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rutgers, Cornell and U.C.L.A. His scholarly interested ranged from Milton to Joyce, and his translations of many classic works of French literature continue to be read to this day.

Shaul Bakhash is Robinson Professor of History at George Mason University and the author of The Reign of the Ayatollahs: Iran and the Islamic Revolution. (September 2005)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

David Brion Davis was Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at Oxford. His books include Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America, 1492–1830 and, most recently, Scots and Catalans: Union and Disunion.
 (May 2019)

Martin Gardner (1914–2010) was a science writer and novelist. He was the author of The New Ambidextrous Universe, Fractal Music, Hypercards and More, The Night is Large and Visitors from Oz.

Peter Green is Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin and Adjunct Professor at the University of Iowa. His books include The Hellenistic Age: A Short History and a translation of the Iliad. His translation of the Odyssey is forthcoming. (October 2017)

Arthur Hertzberg (1921–2006) was a Conservative rabbi, scholar and activist. His books include The French Enlightenment and the Jews: The Origins of Modern Anti-Semitism and The Zionist Idea.

Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

Roger Shattuck (1923–2005) was an American writer and scholar of French culture. He taught at Harvard, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Virginia, and Boston University, where he was named University Professor. His books includeForbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography.

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

James Wolcott is a columnist for Vanity Fair. (October 2018)