Contents


‘A Lone Left Thing’

Marsden Hartley Catalog of the exhibition edited byElizabeth Mankin Kornhauser

My Dear Stieglitz: Letters of Marsden Hartley and Alfred Stieglitz, 1912–1915 edited by James Timothy Voorhies

Haunted by the Russian Devil

Pushkin’s Children: Writings on Russia and Russians by Tatyana Tolstaya, translated from the Russianby Jamey Gambrell, with an introduction by Alma Guillermoprieto

The Slynx by Tatyana Tolstaya, translated from the Russian by Jamey Gambrell

The Strange Case of Dr. B.

Rising to the Light: A Portrait of Bruno Bettelheim by Theron Raines

Not the Thing I Was: Thirteen Years at Bruno Bettelheim’s Orthogenic School by Stephen Eliot

The Creation of Dr. B: A Biography of Bruno Bettelheim by Richard Pollak

The Pelican and After by Tom Wallace Lyons

Bettelheim: A Life and a Legacy by Nina Sutton, translated from the French by David Sharp

Contributors

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as numerous works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. His story in this issue is adapted from Moral Tales, a forthcoming collection. (December 2017)

Andrew Delbanco is Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia and President of the Teagle Foundation. His most recent book is The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for America’s Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War. (January 2019)

Robert Gottlieb has been the Editor in Chief of ­Simon and Schuster and of Knopf, and the Editor of The New Yorker. His most recent book is a collection of essays, Near-Death Experiences…and Others. (July 2019)

Richard Holmes is the author of Shelley, Footsteps, Coleridge, The Age of Wonder, Falling Upwards, and, most recently, This Long Pursuit.
 (June 2019)

Joseph Kerman is emeritus professor of music at the University of California, Berkeley. He began writing music criticism for The Hudson Review in the 1950s, and is a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books and many other journals. His books include Opera as Drama (1956; new and revised edition 1988), The Beethoven Quartets (1967), Contemplating Music (1986), Concerto Conversations (1999), and The Art of Fugue (2005).

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most ­recently, The War That Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters.
 (October 2016)

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. His books include From the Ruins of Empire: The Revolt Against the West and the Remaking of Asia and Age of Anger: A History of the Present. (July 2019)

H. Allen Orr is University Professor and Shirley Cox Kearns Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester. He is the author, with Jerry A. Coyne, of Speciation.
 (June 2016)

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist with The Irish Times and the Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His new book, The Politics of Pain: Postwar En­gland and the Rise of Nationalism, will be published in the US in November. (August 2019)

Alan Ryan is the author of On Tocqueville, On Marx, and the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought from Herodotus to the Present. 
(January 2018)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. Come Closer and Listen, his latest book of poems, will be out next year. (August 2018)

Alexander Stille is San Paolo Professor of International Journalism at Columbia. His most recent book is a memoir, The Force of Things: A Marriage in War and Peace.
 (November 2018)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.