Contents


Red-Hot MoMA

The Museum of Modern Art, New York Yoshio Taniguchi, architect

Modern Painting and Sculpture: 1880 to the Present at the Museum of Modern Art edited by John Elderfield

The Truth About Terrorism

America the Vulnerable: How Our Government Is Failing to Protect Us from Terrorism by Stephen Flynn

Fortress America: On the Front Lines of Homeland Security—An Inside Look at the Coming Surveillance State by Matthew Brzezinski

The 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States by The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks

Imperial Hubris: Why the West Is Losing the War on Terror by "Anonymous" (Michael Scheuer)

Against All Enemies: Inside America’s War on Terror by Richard A. Clarke

The Power of Nightmares by Adam Curtis

Al-Qaeda: Casting a Shadow of Terror by Jason Burke

Hero

Defending Human Rights in Russia: Sergei Kovalyov, Dissident and Human Rights Commissioner, 1969–2003 by Emma Gilligan

The Photograph Man

All the Mighty World: The Photographs of Roger Fenton, 1852–1860 Catalog of the exhibition by Gordon Baldwin, Malcolm Daniel, and Sarah Greenough

Orientally Yours

Anna May Wong: From Laundryman’s Daughterto Hollywood Legend by Graham Russell Gao Hodges

Perpetually Cool:The Many Lives of Anna May Wong (1905–1961) by Anthony B. Chan

Contributors

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (May 2019)

Robert Gottlieb has been the Editor in Chief of ­Simon and Schuster and of Knopf, and the Editor of The New Yorker. His most recent book is a collection of essays, Near-Death Experiences…and Others. (July 2019)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. His books include The Art of Stillness and The Man Within My Head.
 (June 2017)

Tim Judah is currently a Fellow at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen in Vienna. He has reported for The New York Review from, among other places, ­Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.
 (October 2018)

Stephen Kotkin is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton and a senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution. His essay in this issue is adapted from Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929–1941, which will be published in October by Penguin. 
(October 2017)

Daniel Mendelsohn is Editor-at-Large at The New York ­Review and Professor of Humanities at Bard. His new collection of essays, ­Ecstasy and Terror: From the Greeks to Game of Thrones, will be published in October.
 (April 2019)

W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

Aryeh Neier is President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. His most recent book is The International Human Rights Movement: A History. (February 2018)

Sister Helen Prejean is a member of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Medaille and lives in Louisiana. She gives on average 140 lectures a year nationwide, seeking to encourage discussion of the death penalty. She is the author of Dead Man Walking. The article in this issue is adapted from her new book, The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions, to be published by Random House this month. (January 2005)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Jennifer Schuessler is an editor at The New York Times Book Review. (March 2011)

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His latest book is Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know: The Fathers of Wilde, Yeats and Joyce.
 (May 2019)

Henri Zerner, Professor of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard, is the author of Renaissance Art in France: The Invention of Classicism and Écrire l’histoire de l’art: Figures d’une discipline.