Contents


The Marrying Kind

Marriage and Other Acts of Charity by Kate Braestrup

The Marriage-Go-Round: The State of Marriage and the Family in America Today by Andrew J. Cherlin

Why Him? Why Her? How to Find and Keep Lasting Love by Helen Fisher

Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage by Elizabeth Gilbert

Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough by Lori Gottlieb

Bitter Truths

Otto Dix an exhibition at the Neue Galerie, New York City, March 11–August 30, 2010, and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, September 24, 2010–January 2, 2011

Good-bye to Dubai

Dubai: Gilded Cage by Syed Ali

Dubai: The Vulnerability of Success by Christopher M. Davidson

City of Gold: Dubai and the Dream of Capitalism by Jim Krane

South Africa: The Truth Teller

South African Photographs: David Goldblatt An exhibition at the Jewish Museum, New York City, May 2–September 19, 2010

Kith, Kin and Khaya: South African Photographs by David Goldblatt

The Most Happy Couple

Victoria and Albert: Art and Love an exhibition at the Queen's Gallery, London, March 19–October 31, 2010

The Young Victoria a film directed by Jean-Marc Vallée

Righteous & Wrong

The Flight of the Intellectuals by Paul Berman

Nomad: From Islam to America by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Terror and Liberalism by Paul Berman

Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents by Ian Buruma

Facts Are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade Without a Name by Timothy Garton Ash

Contributors

Stanisław Barańczak is a poet, translator, and literary critic. He won the 2007 Nike Award for the best work of Polish literature published in the previous year and the 2009 Silesius Poetry Award for lifetime achievement. He is a professor of Polish language and literature at Harvard University.

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. He is the author of What Is Painting? (January 2019)

Christopher Benfey is the Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of five books about the American Gilded Age, including Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay: Reflections on Art, Family, and Survival (2012) and, most recently, IF: The Untold Story of Kipling’s American Years, published this month by Penguin.
 (July 2019)

Elaine Blair is a regular contributor to The New York Review. (June 2019)

Stephen Breyer is an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. (November 2013)

Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern.
 (November 2017)

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. His latest book is Engines of Liberty: How Citizen Movements Succeed. (August 2019)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Martin Filler’s autobiographical lecture “Makers of Modern Architecture: A Critic’s Journey,” which he gave at the Athenaeum of Philadelphia in April, is available as a podcast at www.philaathenaeum.org. (June 2019)

Mark Ford’s fourth collection of poetry, Enter, Fleeing, was published last year.
 (July 2019)

Ruth Franklin’s most recent book, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life, won the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography.
 (April 2019)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is a novel, ­Summer Hours at the Robbers Library. (April 2019)

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek Bureau Chief and Correspondent-­at-Large in Africa and the Middle East. His latest book is The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu and Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts. Travel for his story in this issue was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. (April 2018)

Joost Hiltermann is the Middle East & North Africa Program Director of the International Crisis Group and the author of A Poisonous Affair: America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja. (December 2017)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Joseph Lelyveld’s most recent book is His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt. (November 2017)

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. He is the author of The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction and, most recently, The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics.
 Visit marklilla.com. (December 2018)

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Theodore R. Marmor is Professor Emeritus of Public Policy and Political Science at Yale. His most recent book is Fads, Fallacies and Foolishness in Medical Care Management and Policy. (August 2010)

Jonathan Oberlander is Professor of Social Medicine and Health Policy and Management at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. He is the author of The Political Life of Medicare.
 (August 2010)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Out of My Head: On the Trail of Consciousness and the novel In Extremis.
 (May 2019)

Michael Pollan is the John S. and James L. Knight Professor of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, In Defense of Food, and, most recently, Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual.
 (June 2010)

Frank Rich is a writer-at-large for New York magazine. His books include Ghost Light, a memoir, and The Greatest Story Ever Sold: The Decline and Fall of Truth in Bush’s America. He is an Executive Producer of the HBO series Veep.

Malise Ruthven is the author of Islam in the World and 
Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning, among other books. He recently edited Carving Up the Globe: An Atlas of Diplomacy.
 (February 2019)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and ­William Nicholson.
 (May 2019)

George Soros is chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. (November 2016)

Wisława Szymborska (1923–2012) won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1996.

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.

Edmund White has written biographies of Jean Genet, Marcel Proust, and Arthur Rimbaud. His memoir The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading will be published in June. (June 2018)

Daniel Wilkinson is Managing Director for the Americas at Human Rights Watch.