Contents


Proustifications

Marcel Proust: Selected Letters (1880-1903) edited by Philip Kolb, translated by Ralph Manheim, with an introduction by J.M. Cocking

Hitler Without His Diaries

Hitler in Vienna, 1907-1913 by J. Sydney Jones

The Nazi Machtergreifung edited by Peter D. Stachura

The Secret Diaries of Hitler’s Doctor by David Irving

Hitler und die Endlösung: “Es ist des Führers Wunsch” of California Press next spring. by Gerald Fleming

A Reply to Slander

The Anatomy of a Lie by S. L. Zivs

Similar material appears in Human Rights: Continuing the Discussion by S. L. Zivs, translated by Dudley Hagen, translated by Dmitri Belyavsky

Holbein’s Faces

“Holbein and the Court of Henry VIII” Elizabeth II, Windsor Castle, at the Pierpont Morgan Library, April 21-July 30, 1983 an exhibition of drawings from the Collection of H.M. Queen

What’s a Girl to Do?

The Rapes of Lucretia: A Myth and Its Transformations by Ian Donaldson

Becoming a Heroine: Reading About Women in Novels by Rachel M. Brownstein

The Rape of Clarissa: Writing, Sexuality and Class Struggle in Samuel Richardson by Terry Eagleton

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Anne Barton is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. She is the author of Essays, Mainly Shakespearean.

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Richard Ellmann (1918–1987) was an American critic and biographer. He taught at Northwestern, Oxford and Emory, where he was named Robert W. Professor in 1980. He won the National Book Award for Nonfiction for James Joycein 1959; a revised edition was awarded the James Tate Black Memorial Prize in 1982.

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

William H. McNeill is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Chicago. His most recent books are The Pursuit of Truth: A Historian’s Memoir and Summers Long Ago: On Grandfather’s Farm and in Grandmother’s Kitchen, published by the Berkshire Publishing Group. His most recent publication, as editor, is the second edition of the Encyclopedia of World History.

V.S. Pritchett (1900–1997) was a British essayist, novelist and short story writer. He worked as a foreign correspondent for the The Christian Science Monitorand as a literary critic forNew Statesman. In 1968 Pritchett was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire; he was knighted in 1975. His body of work includes many collections of short stories, in addition to travelogues, reviews, literary biographies and novels.

Michael Walzer is Professor Emeritus in the School of ­Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and co-­editor emeritus of Dissent. His new book, A Foreign Policy for the Left, will be published in the fall. (May 2017)