Contents


Roughing It

High Albania by Edith Durham

The Passionate Nomad: The Diary of Isabelle Eberhardt by Isabelle Eberhardt

My Journey to Lhasa by Alexandra David-Neel

Beatlephobia

The Lives of John Lennon by Albert Goldman

John Lennon, My Brother by Julia Baird and Geoffrey Giuliano, foreword by Paul McCartney

Imagine: John Lennon written and edited by Andrew Solt and Sam Egan, foreword by Yoko Ono, preface by David L. Wolper

Imagine: John Lennon a film directed by Andrew Solt

Yesterday: The Unauthorized Biography of Paul McCartney by Chet Flippo

The Lennon Companion: Twenty-five Years of Comment edited by Elizabeth Thomson, edited by David Gutman

Tell Me Why: A Beatles Commentary by Tim Riley

City Lights

Threshold of a New World: Intellectuals and the Exile Experience in Paris, 1830–1848 by Lloyd S. Kramer

Restoration and Reaction, 1815–1848 by André Jardin and André-Jean Tudesq, translated by Elborg Forster

Art of Cruelty

Hell Screen, Cogwheels, A Fool’s Life by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, translated by Takashi Kojima and Cid Corman and Will Petersen, with a foreword by Jorge Luis Borges, an introduction by Kazuya Sakai

Childhood Years: A Memoir by Jun'ichiro Tanizaki, translated by Paul McCarthy

Contributors

Robert M. Adams (1915-1996) was a founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rutgers, Cornell and U.C.L.A. His scholarly interested ranged from Milton to Joyce, and his translations of many classic works of French literature continue to be read to this day.

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

Denis Donoghue is Emeritus University Professor of English and American Letters at NYU. (April 2016)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier Professor of Political Economy at Harvard and the author of The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth.

 He is currently finishing a book on the historical influence of religious thinking on economic thinking.(October 2017)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World.
 (December 2017)

Stanley Hoffmann (1928-2015) was the Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Charles Hope was Director of the Warburg Institute, London, from 2001 to 2010. He is the author of Titian.


Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is the author of Rethinking Social Policy and The Homeless, among other books. (June 2016)

James Joll (1936–2011) was a British historian. His books include The Origins of the First World War and Europe Since 1870.

Michael Massing, a former Executive Editor of The Columbia Journalism Review, frequently writes about the press.
 (January 2016)

Mary McCarthy (1912-1989) was a novelist, essayist, and critic. Her political and social commentary, literary essays, and drama criticism appeared in magazines such as Partisan Review, The New Yorker, Harper’s, and The New York Review of Books, and were collected in On the Contrary (1961), Mary McCarthy’s Theatre Chronicles 1937-1962 (1963), The Writing on the Wall (1970), Ideas and the Novel (1980), and Occasional Prose (1985). Her novels include The Company She Keeps (1942), The Oasis (1949), The Groves of Academe (1952), A Charmed Life (1955), The Group (1963), Birds of America (1971), and Cannibals and Missionaries (1979). She was the author of three works of autobiography, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood (1957), How I Grew (1987), and the unfinished Intellectual Memoirs (1992), and two travel books about Italy, Venice Observed (1956) and The Stones of Florence (1959). Her essays on the Vietnam War were collected in The Seventeenth Degree (1974); her essays on Watergate were collected in The Mask of State (1974).

V. S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932 and emigrated to England in 1950, when he won a scholarship to University College, Oxford. He is the author of many novels, including A House for Mr. Biswas, A Bend in the River, and In a Free State, which won the Booker Prize. He has also written several nonfiction works based on his travels, including India: A Million Mutinies Now and Beyond Belief: Islamic Excursions Among the Converted Peoples. He was knighted in 1990 and in 1993 was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize.

Conor Cruise O’Brien (1917–2009) was an Irish historian and politician. He was elected to the Irish parliament in 1969 and served as a Minister from 1973 until 1977. His works include States of Ireland, The Great Melody and Memoir: My Life and Themes.

Luc Sante teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard. His latest book is The Other Paris. (October 2017)

I.F. Stone (1907–1989) was an American journalist and publisher whose self-published newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly, challenged the conservatism of American journalism in the midcentury. A Noncomformist History of Our Times (1989) is a six-volume anthology of Stone’s writings.

Patricia Storace is the author of Heredity, a volume of poems, Dinner with Persephone, a travel memoir about Greece, and Sugar Cane, a children’s book. Her most recent book is the novel A Book of Heaven.
 (July 2016)

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.