Contents


Royal Comedy

Uncrowned King: The Life of Prince Albert by Stanley Weintraub

Mrs. Brown a film directed by John Madden. distributed by Miramax Films

A Single Jew

Talking Horse: Bernard Malamud on Life and Work edited by Alan Cheuse and Nicholas Delbanco

The Complete Stories by Bernard Malamud, edited and introduced by Robert Giroux

The Gods of War

Blood Rites: Origins and History of the Passions of War by Barbara Ehrenreich

The Rosy Future of War by Philippe Delmas

Postmodern War: The New Politics of Conflict by Chris Hables Gray

Poet of Resentment’

Jackie Robinson by Arnold Rampersad

Jackie Robinson: An Intimate Portrait by Rachel Robinson

Baseball’s Great Experiment: Jackie Robinson and His Legacy by Jules Tygiel

I Never Had It Made by Jackie Robinson

The Jackie Robinson Reader: Perspectives of an American Hero edited by Jules Tygiel

Breaking the Line a television documentary broadcast on ESPN, February 28, 1997

Among the Missing

The Spoils of War: World War II and Its Aftermath: The Loss, Reappearance, and Recovery of Cultural Property edited by Elizabeth Simpson

The Lost Museum: The Nazi Conspiracy to Steal the World’s Greatest Works of Art by Hector Feliciano

Why the Cold War Worked

We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History Press by John Lewis Gaddis

The Cominform: Minutes of the Three Conferences 1947/1948/1949 edited by Giuliano Procacci

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

John Gregory Dunne (1932–2003) was a novelist, screenwriter and critic. His final novel is entitled Nothing Lost.

Thomas R. Edwards (1928–2005) was Professor of English at Rutgers and editor of Raritan. His last book was Over Here: Criticizing America.

Howard Gardner teaches psychology at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His most recent book, with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and William Damon, is Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet. (April 2002)

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Miriam Griffin is Fellow and Tutor in Ancient History at Somerville College, Oxford. She is the author of books on Nero and Seneca. (October 1997)

Michael Ignatieff is the Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics. The article in this issue draws on the Ditchley Foundation Annual Lecture, which he gave in July. (September 2014)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Alfred Kazin (1915–1998) was a writer and teacher. Among his books are On Native Grounds, a study of American literature from Howells to Faulkner, and the memoirs A Walker in the Cityand New York Jew. In 1996, he received the first Lifetime Award in Literary Criticism from the Truman Capote Literary Trust.

Alastair Reid (1926 -2014) was a poet, prose chronicler, translator, and traveler. Born in Scotland, he came to the United States in the early 1950s, began publishing his poems in The New Yorker in 1951, and for the next fifty-odd years was a traveling correspondent for that magazine. Having lived in both Spain and Latin America for long spells, he was a constant translator of poetry from the Spanish language, in particular the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Pablo Neruda. He published more than forty books, among them two word books for children, Ounce Dice Trice, with drawings by Ben Shahn, and Supposing…, with drawings by Bob Gill, both available from The New York Review Children’s Collection.

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Willibald Sauerländer is a former Director of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich. His latest book is Manet malt Monet: Ein Sommer in Argenteuil. (June 2013)