Jews and Catholics

A Moral Reckoning: The Role of the Catholic Church in the Holocaust and Its Unfulfilled Duty of Repair by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen

The Cradle Will Rock

The History of the European Family: Volume 1, Family Life in Early Modern Times, 1500–1789 edited by David I. Kertzer and Marzio Barbagli

Ancestors: The Loving Family in Old Europe by Steven Ozment

Medieval Children by Nicholas Orme

Geometrical Creatures

The Annotated Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions by Edwin A. Abbott, with an introduction and notes by Ian Stewart

Flatterland: Like Flatland, Only More So by Ian Stewart

The Cosimos

Cosimo de’ Medici and the Florentine Renaissance by Dale Kent

The Medici, Michelangelo, and the Art of Late Renaissance Florence by Cristina Acidini Luchinat and eleven others


Anne Barton is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. She is the author of Essays, Mainly Shakespearean.

Stephen Burt is a professor at Macalester College. (June 2001)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Christian Caryl is the Editor of the DemocracyPost blog at The Washington Post and the author of Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the Twenty-first Century. (November 2017)

Anita Desai is the author, most recently, of The Artist of Disappearance, a collection of three novellas. (October 2015)

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Eamon Duffy is Emeritus Professor of the History of ­Christianity at the University of Cambridge. His latest book is ­Reformation Divided: Catholics, Protestants and the Conversion of England. (February 2018)

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: ­Poems, 1968–2011. (April 2018)

P. N. Furbank is the author of nine books, including biographies of Samuel Butler, Italo Svevo, and E.M. Forster.

Jim Holt is the author of Why Does the World Exist? His forthcoming book, When Einstein Walked with Gödel, will be published in May. (December 2017)

Jennifer Homans is the author of Apollo’s Angels: A History of Ballet. She is the Founder and Director of the Center for Ballet and the Arts at NYU, where she is also a Distinguished Scholar. She is working on a biography of George Balanchine. 
(December 2017)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World. (February 2018)

Randall Jarrell (1914-1965) was born in Tennessee and graduated from Vanderbilt. A poet, novelist, translator, and critic as well as writer for children, Jarrell was a prolific author whose best-known works include the poems collected in The Woman at the Washington Zoo and The Lost World, the academic comedy Pictures from an Institution, the children’s story The Bat Poet, and Poetry and the Age, a group of essays. An influential critic who, as poetry reviewer for The Nation, helped to launch the careers of Robert Lowell and other contemporaries, Jarrell taught for many years at the University of North Carolina, where he was much revered. He died in a car accident in 1965.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Patrick Marnham’s most recent book is Resistance and Betrayal: The Death and Life of the Greatest Hero of the French Resistance. (December 2002)

Sherwin B. Nuland is Clinical Professor of Surgery and a Fellow of the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale. He is the author of How We Die, which won the National Book Award in 1994, and Lost in America. (December 2005)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Mark Strand, who died late last year, was a poet and artist. He was named Poet Laureate of the United States in 1990 and he won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1999. (June 2015)

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the ­Humanities at Columbia. His latest book is the novel House of Names. (April 2018)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.