Contents


Can We Know Her?

A Woman in Charge: The Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton by Carl Bernstein

Her Way: The Hopes and Ambitions of Hillary Rodham Clinton by Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr.

Herzog and His Heroes

Rescue Dawn a film written and directed by Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog: Documentaries and Shorts, 1962–1999

Herzog (Non)Fiction

The Great Bolaño

The Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolaño, translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer

Distant Star by Roberto Bolaño, translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

Last Evenings on Earth by Roberto Bolaño, translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

2666 by Roberto Bolaño

Lest We Forget

The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall

Remainder by Tom McCarthy

Austerlitz by W.G. Sebald, translated from the German by Anthea Bell

The Vintage Book of Amnesia: An Anthology edited by Jonathan Lethem

What If?

A Tranquil Star: Unpublished Stories by Primo Levi, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein and Alessandra Bastagli

The Grand Inquisitors

Never Again: Securing America and Restoring Justice by John Ashcroft

General Ashcroft: Attorney at War by Nancy V. Baker

Unchecked and Unbalanced: Presidential Power in a Time of Terror by Frederick A.O. Schwarz Jr. and Aziz Z. Huq

It Can Happen Here: Authoritarian Peril in the Age of Bush by Joe Conason

How To Read Elfriede Jelinek

Greed by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Martin Chalmers

Women as Lovers by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Martin Chalmers

Wonderful, Wonderful Times by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Michel Hulse

The Piano Teacher by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Joachim Neugroschel

Lust by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Michael Hulse

Contributors

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as numerous works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. His story in this issue is adapted from Moral Tales, a forthcoming collection. (December 2017)

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. The paperback edition of his book Engines of Liberty: How Citizen Movements Succeed has just been published. (December 2017)

Caleb Crain is the author of American Sympathy, a study of friendship between men in early American literature. He has written for The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and n+1. His novel Necessary Errors will be published in 2013.

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is Codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (November 2016)

Anita Desai is the author, most recently, of The Artist of Disappearance, a collection of three novellas. (October 2015)

Freeman Dyson is Professor of Physics Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His most recent book is Dreams of Earth and Sky, a collection of his writing in these pages. (October 2016)

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa.

Jamey Gambrell is a writer on Russian art and culture. She has translated works by Marina Tsvetaeva and Tatyana Tolstaya, in addition to Vladimir Sorokin’s three-volume Ice Trilogy and his Day of the ­Oprichnik. Her translation of Sorokin’s novel The Blizzard will be published in December 2015.


Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World.
 (December 2017)

Francisco Goldman is the author of four novels, The Long Night of White Chickens, The Ordinary Seaman, The Divine Husband, the forthcoming Say Her Name, and one work of nonfiction, The Art of Political Murder.

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

Claire Messud’s most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. (March 2017)

Joyce Carol Oates’s Beautiful Days, a collection of stories, will be published in February. She is currently Distinguished Writer in Residence in the Graduate Program at NYU. (December 2017)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Jonathan Steele is Chief Reporter for the website The ­Middle East Eye and a former correspondent for The Guardian. His most recent book is Ghosts of Afghanistan.
 (April 2017)

Patricia Storace is the author of Heredity, a volume of poems, Dinner with Persephone, a travel memoir about Greece, and Sugar Cane, a children’s book. Her most recent book is the novel A Book of Heaven.
 (July 2016)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (November 2017)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is the novel House of Names. (July 2017)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (December 2017)