Contents


Venice: The Masters in Boston

Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice an exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, March 15–August 16, 2009, and the Louvre, Paris, September 14, 2009–January 4, 2010

Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice an exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, March 15–August 16, 2009, and the Louvre, Paris, September 14, 2009–January 4, 2010

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate. Her most recent book is Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944–1956.
 (June 2013)

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a political philosopher and historian of ideas. Born in Riga, he moved in 1917 with his family to Petrograd, where he witnessed the Russian Revolution. In 1921 he emigrated to England. He was educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and became a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, where he was later appointed Professor of Social and Political Theory. He served as the first president of Wolfson College, Oxford, and as president of the British Academy. His correspondence between 1975 and 1997 will be published in 2015. The third volume of his correspondence, Building: Letters 1960–1975, was published in 2013.

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. His two new books, The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke: From the Sublime and Beautiful to American Independence and Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, were published earlier this year. (August 2014)

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts and the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio.
 (June 2014)

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial.
 (September 2014)

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Michael Greenberg is the author of Hurry Down ­Sunshine and Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer’s Life. (October 2014)

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan and the author of the travelogue Italian Ways. His latest novel is Sex Is Forbidden.


Amartya Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor at Harvard. He received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998. His most recent book is An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions, cowritten with Jean Drèze.
 (October 2013)

Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University, England. His latest book is How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life with Edward Skidelsky. He is the author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes.
 (April 2014)

Timothy Snyder is Housum Professor of History at Yale and the author of Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. This month, he is to deliver a Philippe Roman Lecture on the origins of the Holocaust at the London School of Economics. (March 2014)

Paul Starr is Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton and the author, most recently, of Remedy and Reaction: The Peculiar American Struggle over Health Care Reform.
 (May 2014)

Derek Walcott is a poet, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. Born in Castries, St. Lucia, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. His epic poem Omerosis a reworking of the Homeric story and tradition into a journey around the Caribbean and beyond to the American West and London.

Blair Worden is Hugh Trevor-Roper’s literary executor. His most recent book is God’s Instruments: Political Conduct in the England of Oliver Cromwell. (January 2014)