Contents


The Secrets of Houdini

Houdini: Art and Magic an exhibition at the Jewish Museum, New York City, October 29, 2010–March 27, 2011; the Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles, April 28–September 11, 2011; the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, September 26, 2011–January 15, 2012;

Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss: American Self-Liberator, Europe’s Eclipsing Sensation, World’s Handcuff King & Prison Breaker by Kenneth Silverman

Houdini’s Box: The Art of Escape by Adam Phillips

The Secret Life of Houdini: The Making of America’s First Superhero by William Kalush and Larry Sloman

Houdini: A Mind in Chains: A Psychoanalytic Portrait by Bernard C. Meyer

The Life and Many Deaths of Harry Houdini by Ruth Brandon

Final Séance: The Strange Friendship Between Houdini and Conan Doyle by Massimo Polidoro

Houdini: The Untold Story by Milbourne Christopher

The Gigantic Democratic Pose

Goldenes Zeitalter: Holländische Gruppenporträts aus dem Amsterdams Historisch Museum (A Golden Age: Dutch Group Portraits from the Amsterdam Historical Museum) an exhibition at the Alte Pinakothek, Munich, December 3, 2010–February 27, 2011.

The Darkest Comedian

My Prizes: An Accounting by Thomas Bernhard, translated from the German by Carol Brown Janeway

Prose by Thomas Bernhard, translated from the German by Martin Chalmers

Ritter, Dene, Voss by Thomas Bernhard, a production by One Little Goat Theater Company, directed by Adam Seelig

Unlucky Jim

Notes from the Archive: James Frazer Stirling, Architect and Teacher an exhibition at the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, October 14, 2010–January 2, 2011; Tate Britain, London, spring/summer 2011; Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart, October 2011–January 2012; and the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal,

An Architect’s Legacy: James Stirling’s Students at Yale, 1959–1983 an exhibition at the Yale School of Architecture Gallery, New Haven, October 13, 2010–January 28, 2011

James Stirling: Early Unpublished Writings on Architecture edited by Mark Crinson

Jim Stirling and the Red Trilogy: Three Radical Buildings edited by Alan Berman

Contributors

Hussein Agha is Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and coauthor of A Framework for a Palestinian National Security Doctrine. (November 2012)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

Martin Filler is the 2017 recipient of the Stephen A. Kliment ­Oculus Award, given by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, for his architecture criticism, which has appeared in these pages since 1985.
 (August 2017)

Tim Flannery is the author of Chasing Kangaroos: A Continent, a Scientist, and a Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Creature and, most recently, Atmosphere of Hope: Searching for Solutions to the Climate 
Crisis.
 (December 2017)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His most recent book is the memoir Avid Reader: A Life. (June 2017)

Robert Pogue Harrison teaches literature at Stanford. His books include Forests: The Shadow of Civilization and Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition. (August 2017)

Max Hastings is the author of many books on military history, including Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War and Inferno: The World at War, 1939–45. His new book, Vietnam: An Epic Tragedy, 1945–75, will be published next year.

 (October 2017)

Adam Kirsch is a poet and critic. His most recent book is The Global Novel: Writing the World in the 21st Century. (June 2017)

Roderick Macfarquhar is Leroy B. Williams Research Professor of History and Political Science at Harvard. His latest publication as editor and contributor is The Politics of China: Sixty Years of the People’s Republic of China. (June 2017)

Robert Malley is Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group. He is writing here in his personal capacity. (November 2012)

Thomas Nagel is University Professor Emeritus at NYU. He is the author of The View from Nowhere, Mortal Questions, and Mind and ­Cosmos, among other books. (September 2017)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His books include Sonata for Jukebox and Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.

 (December 2017)

Orhan Pamuk is the author, most recently, of The Museum of Innocence. He was awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Willibald Sauerländer is a former Director of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich. His latest book is Manet Paints Monet: A Summer in Argenteuil. (May 2016)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (November 2017)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (December 2017)