Contents


Late-Night Whispers from Poland

Sobbing Superpower: Selected Poems by Tadeusz Różewicz, translated from the Polish by Joanna Trzeciak, with a foreword by Edward Hirsch

Here by Wisława Szymborska, translated from the Polish by Clare Cavanagh and Stanisław Barańczak

Unseen Hand by Adam Zagajewski, translated from the Polish by Clare Cavanagh

London’s Apocalypse Then & Now

Frieze Art Fair an exhibition at Regent's Park, London, October 13–16, 2011

Pavilion of Art and Design London an exhibition at Berkeley Square, London, October 12–16, 2011

Postmodernism: Style and Subversion, 1970–1990 an exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, September 24, 2011–January 15, 2012

Gerhard Richter: Panorama an exhibition at Tate Modern, London, October 6, 2011–January 8, 2012, the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, February 12–May 13, 2012, and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, June 6–September 24, 2012

September: A History Painting by Gerhard Richter by Robert Storr

John Martin: Apocalypse an exhibition at Tate Britain, London, September 21, 2011–January 15, 2012

Rage a video game by Bethesda Softworks

China Gets Religion!

The Religious Question in Modern China by Vincent Goossaert and David A. Palmer

Religion in China: Survival and Revival under Communist Rule by Fenggang Yang

God Is Red: The Secret Story of How Christianity Survived and Flourished in Communist China by Liao Yiwu

Redeemed by Fire: The Rise of Popular Christianity in Modern China by Lian Xi

The Question of Shakespeare’s Prejudices

Shakespeare, Sex, and Love by Stanley Wells

Reading Shakespeare’s Sonnets: A New Commentary by Don Paterson

The Tainted Muse: Prejudice and Presumption in Shakespeare and His Time by Robert Brustein

Shakespeare’s Freedom by Stephen Greenblatt

Keeping Watch on the Detectives

One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty by Simon Chesterman

Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security by Daniel J. Solove

The Rights of the People: How Our Search for Safety Invades Our Liberties by David K. Shipler

What I Hate About Writers’ Houses

Seeds: One Man’s Serendipitous Journey to Find the Trees That Inspired Famous American Writers from Faulkner to Kerouac, Welty to Wharton by Richard Horan

A Skeptic’s Guide to Writers’ Houses by Anne Trubek

Battling with Du Bois

Democracy’s Reconstruction: Thinking Politically with W.E.B. Du Bois by Lawrie Balfour

In the Shadow of Du Bois: Afro-Modern Political Thought in America by Robert Gooding-Williams

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. A new ­rewritten edition of his book What Is Painting? will be published in October. (July 2017)

April Bernard’s most recent books are Miss Fuller, a novel, and Brawl & Jag, a collection of poems. (November 2017)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His most recent book is The Crucible of Islam. (December 2017)

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. The paperback edition of his book Engines of Liberty: How Citizen Movements Succeed has just been published. (December 2017)

Jean Daniel founded Le Nouvel Observateur, for which he remains the principal commentator. He has published over twenty books. (December 2011)

Freeman Dyson is Professor of Physics Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His most recent book is Dreams of Earth and Sky, a collection of his writing in these pages. (October 2016)

Edward Jay Epstein is an investigative journalist. His new book, The Annals of Unsolved Crime, was published in March 2013. His Web site is edwardjayepstein.com.

Martin Filler is the 2017 recipient of the Stephen A. Kliment ­Oculus Award, given by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, for his architecture criticism, which has appeared in these pages since 1985.
 (August 2017)

John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.

Michael Hofmann is a Professor in the English Department of the University of Florida. His latest translation is of the story collection Investigations of a Dog: And Other Creatures by Franz Kafka. (June 2017)

Ian Johnson reports from Beijing and Berlin. His new book, The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, was published in April. He received the 2016 Shorenstein Journalism Award. (October 2017)

Joseph Lelyveld’s most recent book is His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt. (November 2017)

Claire Messud’s most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. (March 2017)

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt and the author of four story collections and three novels. Her most recent novel is A Gate at the Stairs and her most recent collection of stories is Bark. (August 2017)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Joseph Roth died at age forty-five in Paris in 1939. He is the author of The Radetzky March, among many other novels. The article in this issue will appear in What I Saw: Reports from Berlin, 1920– 1933, to be published this month by W.W. Norton. (December 2002)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest book is The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney. (December 2017)

Malise Ruthven’s books include Islam in the World, Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning, and Encounters with Islam: On Religion, Politics and Modernity. (June 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (November 2017)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. He is the author of Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much and America in the Movies, among other books.
 (May 2017)

Stefan Zweig (1881–1942), novelist, biographer, poet, and translator, was born in Vienna into a wealthy Austrian Jewish family. During the 1930s, he was one of the best-selling writers in Europe, and was among the most translated German-language writers before the Second World War. With the rise of Nazism, he moved from Salzburg to London (taking British citizenship), to New York, and finally to Brazil, where he committed suicide with his wife. New York Review Books has published Zweig’s novels The Post-Office Girl and Beware of Pity as well as the novella Chess Story.