Contents


Late-Night Whispers from Poland

Sobbing Superpower: Selected Poems by Tadeusz Różewicz, translated from the Polish by Joanna Trzeciak, with a foreword by Edward Hirsch

Here by Wisława Szymborska, translated from the Polish by Clare Cavanagh and Stanisław Barańczak

Unseen Hand by Adam Zagajewski, translated from the Polish by Clare Cavanagh

London’s Apocalypse Then & Now

Frieze Art Fair an exhibition at Regent's Park, London, October 13–16, 2011

Pavilion of Art and Design London an exhibition at Berkeley Square, London, October 12–16, 2011

Postmodernism: Style and Subversion, 1970–1990 an exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, September 24, 2011–January 15, 2012

Gerhard Richter: Panorama an exhibition at Tate Modern, London, October 6, 2011–January 8, 2012, the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, February 12–May 13, 2012, and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, June 6–September 24, 2012

September: A History Painting by Gerhard Richter by Robert Storr

John Martin: Apocalypse an exhibition at Tate Britain, London, September 21, 2011–January 15, 2012

Rage a video game by Bethesda Softworks

China Gets Religion!

The Religious Question in Modern China by Vincent Goossaert and David A. Palmer

Religion in China: Survival and Revival under Communist Rule by Fenggang Yang

God Is Red: The Secret Story of How Christianity Survived and Flourished in Communist China by Liao Yiwu

Redeemed by Fire: The Rise of Popular Christianity in Modern China by Lian Xi

The Question of Shakespeare’s Prejudices

Shakespeare, Sex, and Love by Stanley Wells

Reading Shakespeare’s Sonnets: A New Commentary by Don Paterson

The Tainted Muse: Prejudice and Presumption in Shakespeare and His Time by Robert Brustein

Shakespeare’s Freedom by Stephen Greenblatt

Keeping Watch on the Detectives

One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty by Simon Chesterman

Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security by Daniel J. Solove

The Rights of the People: How Our Search for Safety Invades Our Liberties by David K. Shipler

What I Hate About Writers’ Houses

Seeds: One Man’s Serendipitous Journey to Find the Trees That Inspired Famous American Writers from Faulkner to Kerouac, Welty to Wharton by Richard Horan

A Skeptic’s Guide to Writers’ Houses by Anne Trubek

Battling with Du Bois

Democracy’s Reconstruction: Thinking Politically with W.E.B. Du Bois by Lawrie Balfour

In the Shadow of Du Bois: Afro-Modern Political Thought in America by Robert Gooding-Williams

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

Julian Bell is a painter and writer living in Lewes, England. His Van Gogh: A Power Seething will be published early next year.
 (June 2014)

April Bernard’s most recent books are Romanticism, a ­collection of poems, and Miss Fuller, a novel. (October 2014)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. (August 2014)

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Jean Daniel founded Le Nouvel Observateur, for which he remains the principal commentator. He has published over twenty books. (December 2011)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Edward Jay Epstein is an investigative journalist. His new book, The Annals of Unsolved Crime, was published in March 2013. His Web site is edwardjayepstein.com.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.

Michael Hofmann is a poet and translator. He has translated nine books by Joseph Roth and was awarded the PEN translation prize for String of Pearls. His Selected Poems were published in 2010. He lives in London.

Ian Johnson is a correspondent for The New York Times in ­Beijing. He is writing a book on China’s search for values. (September 2014)

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and Editor of The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (September 2014)

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt University and the author of the story collections Birds of America, Like Life, and Self-Help and the novels Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? and Anagrams. Her new collection of stories, Bark, will be published at the end of February 2014.

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan and the author of the travelogue Italian Ways. His latest novel is Sex Is Forbidden.


Joseph Roth died at age forty-five in Paris in 1939. He is the author of The Radetzky March, among many other novels. The article in this issue will appear in What I Saw: Reports from Berlin, 1920– 1933, to be published this month by W.W. Norton. (December 2002)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


Malise Ruthven is the author of Islam: A Very Short Introduction, Islam in the World: The Divine Supermarket (a study of Christian fundamentalism), A Fury for God: The Islamist Attack on America, A Satanic Affair: Salman Rushdie and the Wrath of Islam, and several other books. His latest book is Encounters with Islam: On Religion, Politics and Modernity.

Antony Shugaar is a translator and a contributing editor at Asymptote Journal. (October 2014)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and author of the e-book Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Beatles and America, Then and Now.
 (June 2014)

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence

Stefan Zweig (1881–1942), novelist, biographer, poet, and translator, was born in Vienna into a wealthy Austrian Jewish family. During the 1930s, he was one of the best-selling writers in Europe, and was among the most translated German-language writers before the Second World War. With the rise of Nazism, he moved from Salzburg to London (taking British citizenship), to New York, and finally to Brazil, where he committed suicide with his wife. New York Review Books has published Zweig’s novels The Post-Office Girl and Beware of Pity as well as the novella Chess Story.