Beautiful, Aesthetic, Erotic

The Last Pre-Raphaelite: Edward Burne-Jones and the Victorian Imagination by Fiona MacCarthy

The New Painting of the 1860s: Between the Pre-Raphaelites and the Aesthetic Movement by Allen Staley

Edward Burne-Jones: The Hidden Humorist by John Christian

The Cult of Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement in Britain, 1860–1900 an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, April 2–July 17, 2011; the Musée d'Orsay, Paris, September 12, 2011–January 15, 2012; and the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, February 18–July 17, 2012

The Cult of Beauty: The Victorian Avant-Garde, 1860–1900 edited by Lynn Federle Orr and Stephen Calloway, assisted by Esmé Whittaker

The New World of William Carlos Williams

Something Urgent I Have to Say to You”: The Life and Works of William Carlos Williams by Herbert Leibowitz

The Poetry of William Carlos Williams of Rutherford by Wendell Berry

By Word of Mouth: Poems from the Spanish, 1916–1959 by William Carlos Williams, compiled and edited by Jonathan Cohen, with a foreword by Julio Marzán

Let the DNA Fit the Crime

The Central Park Five: A Chronicle of a City Wilding by Sarah Burns

Genetic Justice: DNA Data Banks, Criminal Investigations, and Civil Liberties by Sheldon Krimsky and Tania Simoncelli

Convicting The Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong by Brandon L. Garrett

We’re More Unequal Than You Think

The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett

The Darwin Economy: Liberty, Competition, and the Common Good by Robert H. Frank

The Age of Austerity: How Scarcity Will Remake American Politics by Thomas Byrne Edsall

Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous Than Others by James Gilligan


Julian Barnes’s collection of art criticism Keeping an Eye Open is published November 2015. His new novel, The Noise of Time, will come out in 2016.

Richard Bernstein was Time’s bureau chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His most recent book is China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice.

 (November 2014)

Harold Bloom’s most recent books are The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible. He teaches at Yale and is at work on a play, To You Whoever You are: A Pageant Celebrating Walt Whitman.
 (February 2012)

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review and the author, most recently, of Washington Journal: 
Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall.
 (November 2015)

R. J. W. Evans is a Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of 
History Emeritus at Oxford. His books include Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs: Central Europe, c. 1683–1867 (September 2015)

Jonathan Freedland is Executive Editor for Opinion at The Guardian, where he also writes a weekly column. In 2014 he was awarded the Orwell Special Prize for journalism.
 (May 2015)

Jonathan Galassi’s translations of Primo Levi’s poetry appear in The Complete Works of Primo Levi, which was published in September. (December 2015)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth and Other STEM ­Delusions, will appear next March.
 (July 2015)

Adam Kirsch is director of the master’s program in Jewish Studies at Columbia. His new book of poetry, Emblems of the Passing World: Poems After Photographs by August Sander, has just been published. (December 2015)

Klaus Regling, former Director General for Economic and ­Financial Affairs of the European Commission, is Chief Executive Officer of the European Financial Stability Facility. (February 2012)

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. His new book, The Shipwrecked Mind: Intellectuals in History, will be published in 2016.

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. The Lunatic, his new ­volume of poetry, and The Life of Images, a book of his selected prose, were published in April.

George Soros is Chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. His essay in this issue is partly drawn from a speech he delivered in November for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Ukraine Foundation, which promotes democracy and human rights in Ukraine.
 (December 2015)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (November 2015)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His latest book is On Elizabeth Bishop.

Charles Wright’s most recent book is Bye-and-Bye: Selected Late Poems. (February 2012)

Sami Zeidan is a Senior Presenter for Al Jazeera English.
 (February 2012)