Contents


The Virtuoso of Compassion

Valentin de Boulogne: Beyond Caravaggio an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, October 7, 2016–January 22, 2017; and the Musée du Louvre, Paris, February 20–May 22, 2017

Beyond Caravaggio an exhibition at the National Gallery, London, October 12, 2016–January 15, 2017; the National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, February 11–May 14, 2017; and the Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh, June 17–September 24, 2017

The Guardian of Mercy: How an Extraordinary Painting by Caravaggio Changed an Ordinary Life Today by Terence Ward

The Seven Acts of Mercy a play by Anders Lustgarten, produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, November 24, 2016–February 10, 2017

The Confidence Man of American Art

Robert Rauschenberg an exhibition at Tate Modern, London, December 1, 2016–April 2, 2017; the Museum of Modern Art, New York City, May 21, 2017–September 17, 2017; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, November 4, 2017–March 25, 2018

The ‘Indescribable Fragrance’ of Youths

A Third Gender: Beautiful Youths in Japanese Edo-Period Prints and Paintings (1600–1868) an exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario, May 7–November 27, 2016; and the Japan Society, New York City, March 10–June 11, 2017

At the Center of a Roiling World

The Crucible of Islam by G.W. Bowersock

The Garima Gospels: Early Illuminated Gospel Books from Ethiopia by Judith S. McKenzie and Francis Watson

The Red Monastery Church: Beauty and Asceticism in Upper Egypt edited by Elizabeth S. Bolman

The Painter and the Novelist

Vanessa Bell (1879–1961) an exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, February 8–June 4, 2017

Sussex Modernism: Retreat and Rebellion an exhibition at Two Temple Place, London, January 28–April 23, 2017

Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision Catalog of an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, London, by Frances Spalding

Vanessa and Her Sister: A Novel by Priya Parmar

Becoming Virginia Woolf: Her Early Diaries and the Diaries She Read by Barbara Lounsberry

Contributors

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. A new ­rewritten edition of his book What Is Painting? will be published in October. (July 2017)

Elaine Blair is a regular contributor to The New York Review. (July 2017)

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His latest book is Treasure in Heaven: The Holy Poor in Early Christianity. (May 2017)

Ian Buruma will be the new editor of The New York Review of Books in September 2017. He has been a frequent contributor to the Review since 1985. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. (June 2017)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Robert Darnton, the Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian Emeritus at Harvard, is currently a Fellow at the Institut d’études avancées in Paris. (May 2017)

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

Susan Dunn, the Massachusetts Professor of Humanities at Williams, is the author of Dominion of Memories: Jefferson, Madison, and the Decline of Virginia. Her latest book is 1940: FDR, Willkie, Lindbergh, Hitler—the Election amid the Storm.
 (May 2017)

Deborah Eisenberg is the author of four collections of short stories and a play, Pastorale. (April 2016)

Yasmine El Rashidi is the author of The Battle for Egypt: Dispatches from the Revolution and the novel Chronicle of a Last Summer.
 (April 2017)

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author, most recently, of Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991: A History.
 (May 2017)

Ruth Franklin’s most recent book is Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life, for which she received the National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography in 2016.
 (May 2017)

Jonathan Freedland is an editorial-page columnist for The Guardian. His next novel is To Kill the President, published under the pseudonym Sam Bourne. (July 2017)

Jonathan Galassi’s most recent books are Muse, a novel, and Left-Handed, a volume of poems. (May 2017)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World.
 (January 2017)

Alma Guillermoprieto is a frequent contributor to The New York Review, often writing on Latin America. She is the author of Dancing with Cuba: A Memoir of the Revolution, among other books.
 (May 2016)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. (July 2017)

Jennifer Homans is the author of Apollo’s Angels: A History of Ballet. She is the Founder and Director of the Center for Ballet and the Arts at NYU, where she is also a Distinguished Scholar. She is currently working on a biography of George Balanchine.
 
(May 2016)

Paul Levy is the editor of The Letters of Lytton Strachey, among other books.


Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. With New York Review Books he has published The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016), The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics (2nd. ed., 2016), and, with Robert Silvers and Ronald Dworkin, The Legacy of Isaiah Berlin (2001). His other books include G.B. Vico: The Making of an Anti-Modern (1994), The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West (2007), and, most recently, The Once and Future Liberal: On Political Reaction (2017). He was the 2015 Overseas Press Club of America winner of the Best Commentary on International News in Any Medium for his New York Review series “On France.” Visit marklilla.com.

Janet Malcolm is the author of Reading Chekhov: A Critical ­Journey, among other books. (June 2016)

Jessica T. Mathews was President of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace from 1997 until 2015 and is now a Distinguished ­Fellow there. She has served in the State Department and on the National Security Council staff in the White House.
 (August 2017)

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist with The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His book on George Bernard Shaw, Judging Shaw, will be published in the fall.
 (June 2017)

Jed Perl’s Calder: The Conquest of Time, the first volume of his biography of the American sculptor, will be published in October. (August 2017)

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (August 2017)

Nathaniel Rich is the author of Odds Against Tomorrow and The Mayor’s Tongue. (April 2017)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her new book, The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney, will be published in October. (August 2017)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and William Nicholson. (July 2017)

Zadie Smith’s new novel, Swing Time, was published in November. (December 2016)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is the novel House of Names. (July 2017)

Michael Walzer is Professor Emeritus in the School of ­Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and co-­editor emeritus of Dissent. His new book, A Foreign Policy for the Left, will be published in the fall. (May 2017)