The Oracle of Our Unease

The enchanted terms in which F. Scott Fitzgerald portrayed modern America still blind us to how scathingly he judged it. “It was an age of satire,” he wrote, and yet we suppose that the writer who both embodied the Jazz Age and identified satire as its essential feature never employed it himself. Fitzgerald’s sardonic humor and his disquiet—the sense that “life is essentially a cheat and its conditions those of defeat,” as he later wrote—give his best work moral realism and gravitas, grounding the flights of his prose.
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A Poetry Manual

a poem
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A Second Chance
A trial jury is like an audience at a play that wants to be entertained. Witnesses, like stage actors, have to play to that audience if their performances are to be convincing.
Night and Day
Democrats are gambling that abhorrence of Trump is sufficiently strong to motivate voters, and Biden and Harris can offer comfort and empathy instead.

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130 Degrees
This is going to be a century of crises, many of them more dangerous than what we’re living through now.

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Unpresidented
Toxic residues from the Civil War, the Vietnam War, and the so-called war on terror continue to flow into American politics
How to Fix Child Poverty
The National Academies estimate that child poverty costs the country $800 billion to $1.1 trillion a year—including lower adult earnings, worse health, and higher crime.

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The Pillage of India
William Dalrymple’s ‘The Anarchy: The East India Company, Corporate Violence, and the Pillage of an Empire’ and Shashi Tharoor’s ‘Inglorious Empire: What the British Did to India’

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