Contents


A Family Matter

The Lardners: My Family Remembered by Ring Lardner Jr.

Some Champions by Ring Lardner, edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli and Richard Layman

The Story of a Wonder Man by Ring Lardner

Reflections on Terrorism

On Revolt: Strategies of National Liberation by J. Bowyer Bell

Transnational Terror DC/Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, Stanford University by J. Bowyer Bell

Terrorists and Terrorism by Edward Hyams

Revolutionary Guerrilla Warfare edited by Sam C. Sarkesian

Vigilante Politics edited by H. Jon Rosenbaum, edited by Peter C. Sederberg

Contributors

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

D.J. Enright (1920–2002) was a British poet, novelist and critic. He held teaching positions in Egypt, Japan, Thailand, Singapore and the United Kingdom. In 1981 Enright was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Jonathan Miller has directed operas and plays throughout the world, most recently Pelléas and Mélisande at the Metropolitan Opera. His many books include The Body in Question, States of Mind, On Reflection, and Nowhere in Particular. The article that appears in this issue is based on a talk given at the New York Public Library. (May 2000)

V. S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932 and emigrated to England in 1950, when he won a scholarship to University College, Oxford. He is the author of many novels, including A House for Mr. Biswas, A Bend in the River, and In a Free State, which won the Booker Prize. He has also written several nonfiction works based on his travels, including India: A Million Mutinies Now and Beyond Belief: Islamic Excursions Among the Converted Peoples. He was knighted in 1990 and in 1993 was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize.

Conor Cruise O’Brien (1917–2009) was an Irish historian and politician. He was elected to the Irish parliament in 1969 and served as a Minister from 1973 until 1977. His works include States of Ireland, The Great Melody and Memoir: My Life and Themes.

Roger Sale is a critic and journalist. Until 1999, he was Professor of English at the University of Washington. His books include Modern Heroism: Essays on D. H. Lawrence, William Empson and J.R.R. Tolkien and On Not Being Good Enough: Writings of a Working Critic.

Stephen Spender (1909–1995) was an English poet and essayist. As a young man, he became friends with W.H. Auden, Louis MacNeice, Cecil Day-Lewis, and Christopher Isherwood, a loose collection often referred to as “the Auden Group” or “MacSpaunday.” He published many collections of poems, including The Still Centre and Ruins and Visions, and numerous volumes of nonfiction and other works, including Learning Laughterand Love-Hate Relations.

Garry Wills, a journalist and historian, is the author of numerous books, including Nixon Agonistes (1970), Inventing America (1978), Explaining America: The Federalist (1981), and Lincoln at Gettysburg (1993), which won a Pulitzer Prize that year. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters (2017). (November 2019)