Contents


The Golden Arm

Robotics edited by Marvin Minsky

Work Transformed: Automation and Labor in the Computer Age by Harley Shaiken

The Robotics Revolution: The Complete Guide for Managers and Engineers by Peter B. Scott

Robots: Machines in Man’s Image by Isaac Asimov and Karen A. Frenkel

Smart Robots: A Handbook of Intelligent Robotic Systems by V. Daniel Hunt

Contributors

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as numerous works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. His story in this issue is adapted from Moral Tales, a forthcoming collection. (December 2017)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at ­Oxford. His books include Spain, Europe and the Wider World, 1500–1800 and ­History in the Making. (June 2016)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: ­Poems, 1968–2011. (July 2018)

Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is the author of Rethinking Social Policy and The Homeless, among other books. (June 2016)

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Alison Lurie is the Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of ten novels, two collections of essays on children’s literature, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent book is Reading for Fun. (March 2017)

Janet Malcolm’s latest book is Forty-one False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers. Her next essay collection, Nobody’s Looking at You, will be published next year. (July 2018)

Czeslaw Milosz (1911–2004) was born in Szetejnie, Lithuania. Over the course of his long and prolific career he published works in many genres, including criticism (The Captive Mind), fiction (The Issa Valley), memoir (Native Realm), and poetry (New and Collected Poems, 1931-2001). He was a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980.

Adam Zagajewski is a Polish poet and the author of twelve volumes of verse, seven of which have been translated into English. His next collection, Asymmetry, will be published in November. Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern. (September 2018)