Contents


The Fantastical Neoclassical

L’Antiquité rêvée: innovations et résistances au XVIIIe siècle an exhibition at the Musée du Louvre, Paris, December 2, 2010–February 14, 2011, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, March 20–May 30, 2011.

Resisting Climate Reality

Smart Solutions to Climate Change: Comparing Costs and Benefits edited by Bjørn Lomborg

Cool It a film directed by Ondi Timoner

Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth by Mark Hertsgaard

Contributors

Kabir (c. 1440–1518), the North Indian devotional or bhakti poet, was born in Benares (now Varanasi) and lived in the fifteenth century. Next to nothing is known of his life, though many legends surround him. He is said to have been a weaver, and in his resolutely undogmatic and often riddling work he debunks both Hinduism and Islam. The songs of this extraordinary poet, philosopher, and satirist, who believed in a personal god, have been sung and recited by millions throughout North India for half a millennium.

Julian Barnes’s most recent books are Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art and The Noise of Time, a novel.
 (April 2017)

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. A new, rewritten edition of his book What Is Painting? was published in October. (December 2017)

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Augustine of Hippo: A Biography and, most recently, Treasure in Heaven: The Holy Poor in Early Christianity. (October 2017)

Ian Buruma is the editor of The New York Review. His memoir, A Tokyo Romance, was published this year. (September 2018)

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. His most recent book is Engines of Liberty: How Citizen Movements Succeed. 
(September 2018)

Steve Coll is Dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of ­Journalism. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001.


 (June 2016)

Richard Dorment was the art critic for the Daily Telegraph between 1986 and 2015.

Haleh Esfandiari is the Director of the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., and the author of My Prison, My Home: One Woman’s Story of Captivity in Iran. She was held in solitary confinement in Evin Prison in Iran for 105 days in 2007. (April 2011)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. His books include The Art of Stillness and The Man Within My Head.
 (June 2017)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. With New York Review Books he has published The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016), The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics (2nd. ed., 2016), and, with Robert Silvers and Ronald Dworkin, The Legacy of Isaiah Berlin (2001). His other books include G.B. Vico: The Making of an Anti-Modern (1994), The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West (2007), and, most recently, The Once and Future Liberal: On Political Reaction (2017). He was the 2015 Overseas Press Club of America winner of the Best Commentary on International News in Any Medium for his New York Review series “On France.” Visit marklilla.com.

Janet Malcolm’s latest book is Forty-one False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers. Her next essay collection, Nobody’s Looking at You, will be published next year. (July 2018)

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org, the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury, and the author, most recently, of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. (February 2017)

Arvind Krishna Mehrotra is the author of four books of poetry, the editor of The Oxford India Anthology of Twelve Modern Indian Poets and Collected Poems in English by Arun Kolatkar, and the translator of The Absent Traveller: Prakrit Love Poetry. A volume of his essays, Partial Recall: Essays on Literature and Literary History will be published in 2011. He is a professor of English at the University of Allahabad and lives in Allahabad and Dehra Dun.

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Nicolas Pelham is The Economist’s Middle East correspondent. His most recent book is Holy Lands: Reviving Pluralism in the Middle East. (October 2016)

Graham Robb is the author of biographies of Balzac, Hugo, and Rimbaud. His latest book is The Discovery of Middle Earth: Mapping the Lost World of the Celts.
 (December 2013)

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Malise Ruthven’s books include Islam in the World and Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning. He recently edited Carving Up the Globe: An Atlas of Diplomacy, to be published in June.
 (June 2018)

James Salter, who died on June 19, was a novelist and short-story writer whose books included A Sport and a Pastime, Light Years, Dusk and Other ­Stories, and, most recently, All That Is
. (August 2015)

Cathleen Schine’s latest novel is They May Not Mean to but They Do. (August 2018)

Jonas Gahr Støre is the Norwegian Minister of Foreign Affairs. (April 2011)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.

Garry Wills, whose most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters, is the 2018 commencement speaker at Zaytuna College, the first accredited Muslim campus in America. (June 2018)