Contents


Revealing a Great Artist

Bronzino: Artist and Poet at the Court of the Medici an exhibition at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, September 24, 2010–

The Drawings of Bronzino an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City,

The Intimate Orwell

Diaries by George Orwell, edited by Peter Davison

George Orwell: A Life in Letters selected and annotated by Peter Davison

Contributors

Ian Buruma is the author of numerous books, including Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Year Zero: A History of 1945, and, most recently, A Tokyo Romance.

Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern.
 (November 2017)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Helen Epstein is Visiting Professor of Human Rights and Global Public Health at Bard. She is the author of Another Fine Mess: America, Uganda, and the War on Terror and The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa. (March 2020)

Martin Filler’s article “The Dark Lady of High Tech,” which appeared in The New York Times Magazine (January 27, 1980), was one of the first critical reappraisals of Eileen Gray’s career to appear in the popular press after her death. (September 2020)

Robert Pogue Harrison teaches literature at Stanford. His latest book is Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age.
 (March 2020)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. His books include The Art of Stillness and The Man Within My Head.
 (June 2017)

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Simon Leys (1935–2014) was the pen name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian Na­tional University and was Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. Leys was a contributor to such publications as The New York Review of Books, Le Monde, and Le Figaro Littéraire, writing on literature and contemporary China. Among his books are Chinese Shadows, Other People’s Thoughts, and The Wreck of the Batavia & Prosper. In addition to The Death of Napoleon NYRB publishes The Hall of Uselessness, a collection of essays, and On the Abolition of All Political Parties, an essay by Simone Weil that Leys translated and edited. His many awards include the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Femina, the Prix Guizot, and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

José Manuel Prieto is a novelist, translator, and Associate Professor at Seton Hall. His latest book is La Revolución Cubana Explicada a Los Taxistas. (September 2020)

Nathaniel Rich’s latest book, Losing Earth: A Recent History, a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award, was published in paperback in March.
 (April 2020)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor of History and Classics at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest books are The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney, and The Divine Spark of Syracuse. (August 2020)

David Shulman’s Freedom and Despair: Notes from the South Hebron Hills was published in 2018. He is Professor Emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and was awarded the Israel Prize for Religious Studies in 2016. (September 2020)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. Come Closer and Listen, his latest book of poems, will be out next year. (August 2018)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. His book If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed, and How It Might Be Saved will be published in paperback in June. (July 2020)

Garry Wills, a journalist and historian, is the author of numerous books, including Nixon Agonistes (1970), Inventing America (1978), Explaining America: The Federalist (1981), and Lincoln at Gettysburg (1993), which won a Pulitzer Prize that year. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters (2017). (November 2019)

Adam Zagajewski is a Polish poet and the author of twelve volumes of verse, seven of which have been translated into English. His next collection, Asymmetry, will be published in November. Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern. (September 2018)