What Ez Could Do

Poems and Translations by Ezra Pound, edited by Richard Sieburth

The Pisan Cantos by Ezra Pound, edited by Richard Sieburth

The Greatest

Turner by James Hamilton

Turner’s Britain Catalog of the exhibition by James Hamilton

Turner and Venice Catalog of the exhibition by Ian Warrell

Turner: The Late Seascapes Catalog of the exhibition by James Hamilton

The Sun Rising Through Vapour”: Turner’s Early Seascapes Catalog of the exhibition by Paul Spencer-Longhurst

A Tract for the Times

Inventing a Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson by Gore Vidal

Washington, D.C. by Gore Vidal

Burr by Gore Vidal

Lincoln by Gore Vidal

Homage to Daniel Shays: Collected Essays, 1952–1972 by Gore Vidal

The Last Empire: Essays, 1992–2000 by Gore Vidal

Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace: How We Got to Be So Hated by Gore Vidal

Dreaming War: Blood for Oil and the Cheney-Bush Junta by Gore Vidal

It’s All Greek!

The Peloponnesian War by Donald Kagan

The Spartans: The World of the Warrior-Heroes of Ancient Greece, from Utopia to Crisis and Collapse by Paul Cartledge

Coming of Age in Ancient Greece: Images of Childhood from the Classical Past by Jenifer Neils and John H. Oakley

Greek Gods, Human Lives: What We Can Learn from Myths by Mary Lefkowitz

Health for Sale

Transformation of the Welfare State: The Silent Surrender of Public Responsibility by Neil Gilbert, with a foreword by Amitai Etzioni

Taxing Ourselves: A Citizen’s Guide to the Great Debate over Tax Reform by Joel Slemrod and Jon Bakija

The Divided Welfare State: The Battle over Public and Private Social Benefits in the United States by Jacob S. Hacker

Banking on Death: Or, Investing in Life: The History and Future of Pensions by Robin Blackburn


André Aciman is the author of the novels Eight White Nights and Call Me by Your Name, the nonfiction works Out of Egypt and False Papers, and is the editor of The Proust Project. He teaches comparative literature at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma is the author of The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013), and Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War (2014), winner of the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book, Their ­Promised Land: My Grandparents in Love and War, will be published in January 2016.

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at ­Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His forthcoming book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His writing and other work can be found at

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Thomas R. Edwards (1928–2005) was Professor of English at Rutgers and editor of Raritan. His last book was Over Here: Criticizing America.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. His latest book is Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His most recent book is Great ­Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens.
 (June 2015)

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Lewis Lockwood is Fanny Peabody Research Professor of Music at Harvard. He is the author of Beethoven: The Music and the Life and, most recently, co-editor with Mark Kroll of The Beethoven Violin Sonatas: History, Criticism, Performance. (November 2004)

Jeff Madrick is the director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Re­discovering Government Initiative at the Century Foundation and editor of Challenge Magazine. His new book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Damaged America and the World.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His ­seventh collection of poetry, In a Mist, was published in March 2015.

Joyce Carol Oates’s memoir The Lost Landscape is published this October 2015.

Cathleen Schine is the author of several novels, including Rameau’s Niece, The Love Letter, She is Me, The New Yorkers, and The Three Weissmanns of Westport. Her new novel, They May Not Mean To, But They Do, will be published in June 2016. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

Jennifer Schuessler is an editor at The New York Times Book Review. (March 2011)

Henry Siegman is President of the U.S./Middle East Project. He is a non-resident research professor at the Sir Joseph Hotung Middle East Program, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, a former Senior Fellow on the Middle East at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a former National Director of the American Jewish Congress.

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. The Lunatic, his new ­volume of poetry, and The Life of Images, a book of his selected prose, were published in April.

Frank J. Sulloway is Visiting Scholar in the Institute of Personality and Social Research at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author most recently of Born to Rebel: Birth Order, Family Dynamics, and Creative Lives. (November 2006)