Contents


A Track All His Own

Martìn Ramìrez Catalog of the exhibition by Brooke Davis Anderson, with essays by Vìctor M. Espinosa and Kristin E. Espinosa, Daniel Baumann, and Victor Zamudio-Taylor, a foreword by Maria Ann Conelli, and an introduction by Robert Storr.

Let Virgil Be Virgil’

The Aeneid by Virgil, translated from the Latin by Robert Fagles, with anintroduction by Bernard Knox

Aeneid by Virgil, translated from the Latin by Stanley Lombardo, with anintroduction by W.R. Johnson

The American Prison Nightmare

Punishment and Inequality in America by Bruce Western

Confronting Confinement: A Report of the Commission on Safety and Abuse in America’s Prisons by John J. Gibbons and Nicholas de B. Katzenbach, co-chairs

Locked Out: Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy by Jeff Manza and Christopher Uggen

Justice for Warriors

The Bonus Army: An American Epic by Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen

Soldiers to Citizens: The G.I. Bill and the Making of the Greatest Generation by Suzanne Mettler

Over Here: How the G.I. Bill Transformed the American Dream by Edward Humes

A Highly Paradoxical Historian

Letters from Oxford: Hugh Trevor-Roper to Bernard Berenson edited by Richard Davenport-Hines

Europe’s Physician: The Various Life of Sir Theodore de Mayerne by Hugh Trevor-Roper

The Lessons of Spinoza

The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World by Matthew Stewart

Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity by Rebecca Goldstein

Contributors

Taylor Branch is the author of America in the King Years, a narrative history of the modern Civil Rights era in three volumes: Parting the Waters, Pillar of Fire, and At Canaan’s Edge. (April 2007)

Jason DeParle, a reporter for The New York Times, is the author of American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids, and a Nation’s Drive to End Welfare. (April 2007)

William Finnegan’s books include A Complicated War: The Harrowing of Mozambique and Cold New World: Growing Up in a Harder Country. (April 2007)

Stephen Greenblatt is the author of, among other books, Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare and The Swerve: How the World Became Modern (winner of the National Book Award, the James Russell Lowell Award, and the Pulitzer Prize). He is the John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard.

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Richard Holmes is the author of Shelley: The Pursuit (published by NYRB Classics), which won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1974; Coleridge: Early Visions, winner of the 1989 Whitbread Book of the Year award; Dr Johnson & Mr Savage, which won the 1993 James Tait Black Prize; and Coleridge: Darker Reflections, which won the 1990 Duff Cooper Prize and Heinemann Award. His new book, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air, was published in October 2013. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1992. He is also a professor of biographical studies at the University of East Anglia. He lives in London and Norwich with the novelist Rose Tremain.

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Daniel J. Kevles is Stanley Woodward Professor of History at Yale. His recent works include The Baltimore Case and he is currently completing a history of intellectual property in plants, animals, and people.


Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the winner of the 2012 Philosophical Book Award (Hanover) for his most recent book, On Compromise and Rotten Compromises. He is currently Edwin Heafey Jr. Visiting Professor at Stanford.


William H. McNeill is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Chicago. His most recent books are The Pursuit of Truth: A Historian’s Memoir and Summers Long Ago: On Grandfather’s Farm and in Grandmother’s Kitchen, published by the Berkshire Publishing Group. His most recent publication, as editor, is the second edition of the Encyclopedia of World History.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Hayden Pelliccia is a Professor of Classics at Cornell. (November 2012)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (April 2014)

George Soros is Chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. (April 2014)

Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfillment in Early Modern England.

Colm Tóibín is the author of seven novels and two collections of stories. His play, The Testament of Mary, is now being staged at the Walter Kerr Theatre in New York City. He has been a visiting writer at Stanford, the University of Texas at Austin, and Princeton, and is now the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia.