Contents


Pakistan: Why Drones Don’t Help

Living Under Drones: Death, Injury, and Trauma to Civilians from US Drone Practices in Pakistan a report by the International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic at Stanford Law School and the Global Justice Clinic at the NYU School of Law

Under the Drones: Modern Lives in the Afghanistan-Pakistan Borderlands edited by Shahzad Bashir and Robert D. Crews

One Abraham or Three?’

Inheriting Abraham: The Legacy of the Patriarch in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam by Jon D. Levenson

Jacob: Unexpected Patriarch by Yair Zakovitch, translated from the Hebrew by Valerie Zakovitch

A Genius from Four Countries

Birth Certificate: The Story of Danilo Kiš by Mark Thompson

The Attic translated from the Serbian and with an introduction by John K. Cox

Psalm 44 translated from the Serbian with an afterword by John K. Cox, and with a preface by Aleksandar Hemon

Garden, Ashes translated from the Serbian by William J. Hannaher, with an introduction by Aleksandar Hemon

Early Sorrows translated from the Serbian by Michael Henry Heim

Hourglass translated from the Serbian by Ralph Manheim

A Tomb for Boris Davidovich translated from the Serbian by Duška Mikić-Mitchell, with an introduction by Joseph Brodsky and an afterword by William T. Vollmann

The Encyclopedia of the Dead translated from the Serbian by Michael Henry Heim

The Lute and the Scars translated from the Serbian with an afterword by John K. Cox, and with a preface by Adam Thirlwell

Contributors

Joan Acocella is a staff writer for The New Yorker. She is the author of Mark Morris, Creating Hysteria: Women and Multiple Personality Disorder, and Willa Cather and the Politics of Criticism. She also edited the recent, unexpurgated Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky. Her article in the May 23, 2013 issue is adapted from her introduction to a new edition of Isadora Duncan’s My Life, published in May 2013 by Liveright.


Peter Brooks is Sterling Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale and Andrew W. Mellon Scholar at Princeton. His books include The Melodramatic Imagination, Reading for the Plot, and, as editor, the recently published The Humanities and Public Life.

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


Mohsin Hamid lives in Lahore. His new novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, was published this spring.
 (May 2013)

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Adam Hochschild has written for The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, The New York Review of Books, and The Nation. His books include King Leopold’s Ghost and, most recently, To End All Wars. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.

Jim Holt writes about science and philosophy. His latest book is Why Does the World Exist? An Existential Detective Story.
 (December 2013)

Adam Kirsch’s second collection of poems is Invasions. His new book of essays, Rocket and Lightship, will be published this fall. (September 2014)

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China and was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London.
 (July 2014)

Andrew O’Hagan’s new novel, The Illuminations, will be published early next year. (October 2014)

Frederick Seidel’s most recent book of poems is Nice Weather. (November 2014)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013.

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University ­Professor at Harvard. His new book, Wiser (with Reid Hastie), will be published in January 2015.
 (December 2014)

Colm Tóibín is the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent novel is Nora Webster.

Paul Wilson is a writer based in Toronto. He has translated major works by Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Klíma, Bohumil Hrabal, and Václav Havel into English.
 (April 2014)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.