Contents


A Hemingway Surprise

Ernest Hemingway: Between Two Wars an exhibition at the Morgan Library and Museum, New York City, September 25, 2015–January 31, 2016

The Truth About Mexican-Americans

Mexicans in the Making of America by Neil Foley

A Nation of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story by Tom Gjelten

The Latino Generation: Voices of the New America by Mario T. García

Latino America: How America’s Most Dynamic Population Is Poised to Transform the Politics of the Nation by Matt Barreto and Gary M. Segura

Satan in Salem

The Witches: Salem, 1692 by Stacy Schiff

Satan and Salem: The Witch-Hunt Crisis of 1692 by Benjamin C. Ray

Medical Research on Humans: Making It Ethical

The Nuremberg Code issued by the Nuremberg tribunal in 1947

The Declaration of Helsinki issued by the World Medical Association in 1964 and revised most recently in 2013

The Common Rule (Title 45, Part 46, Subpart A, Code of Federal Regulations) issued by the US Department of Health and Human Services in 1991

The Ethics Police? The Struggle to Make Human Research Safe by Robert L. Klitzman

How He Ruled Art

Paul Durand-Ruel: Memoirs of the First Impressionist Art Dealer (1831–1922) revised, corrected, and annotated by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, and translated from the French by Deke Dusinberre

Inventing Impressionism: Paul Durand-Ruel and the Modern Art Market Catalog of a recent exhibition at the Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, the National Gallery, London, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art

The Greatness of William Blake

Those Who Write for Immortality: Romantic Reputations and the Dream of Lasting Fame by H.J. Jackson

Eternity’s Sunrise: The Imaginative World of William Blake by Leo Damrosch

Poems by William Blake, selected and introduced by Patti Smith

Contributors

Marcia Angell is a member of the faculty of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the former Editor in Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine. 
(June 2017)

Colin B. Bailey is Director of the Morgan Library and Museum. His books include Patriotic Taste: Collecting ­Modern Art in Pre-Revolutionary Paris, which was awarded the 2004 Mitchell Prize, and Fragonard’s Progress of Love at the Frick Collection. (February 2017)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, was recently published in paperback. (November 2016)

Peter Brooks, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale, teaches at Princeton. His book Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris was published in April. (July 2017)

John Demos is the Samuel Knight Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic. (December 2015)

Gregory Hays is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Virginia. (June 2017)

Richard Holmes books include Shelley, Footsteps, Coleridge, The Age of Wonder, and, most recently, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air. His memoir This Long Pursuit will be published next spring.
 (November 2016)

Jim Holt’s latest book is Why Does the World Exist? (November 2016)

Patrick Vinton Kirch is Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Berkeley. His most recent book is A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai‘i.
 (December 2015)

Adam Kirsch is a poet and critic. His most recent book is The Global Novel: Writing the World in the 21st Century. (June 2017)

Phillip Lopate’s most recent book, A Mother’s Tale, was published in January. He is the Director of the nonfiction writing program at Columbia. (February 2017)

Roger Lowenstein’s new book, America’s Bank: The Epic Struggle to Create the Federal Reserve, was published in October.
 (December 2015)

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, teaches at Bard. His new memoir, An Odyssey: A ­Father, a Son, and an Epic, will be published in September.
 (April 2017)

Richard Pipes is Professor of History Emeritus at Harvard. He is the ­author of numerous books, including The Russian Revolution, Russia Under the Old Regime, and, most recently, Alexander Yakovlev: The Man Whose Ideas Delivered Russia from Communism. (October 2016)

Julia Preston is a contributing writer at the Marshall Project. From 2006 until 2016 she was the National Immigration Correspondent for The New York Times.
 (May 2017)

Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer at Bard. Her new novel, Mister Monkey, was published last fall. (July 2017)

Jed S. Rakoff is a United States District Judge for the Southern District of New York. (June 2017)

Max Rodenbeck is the Middle East Bureau Chief of The Economist. (December 2015)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her new book, The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney, will be published in October. (June 2017)

George B. Stauffer iis Dean of the Mason Gross School of the Arts and Distinguished Professor of Music History at Rutgers. His publications include Bach: The Mass in B Minor—The Great Catholic Mass.


 (June 2016)

Jonathan Steele is Chief Reporter for the website The ­Middle East Eye and a former correspondent for The Guardian. His most recent book is Ghosts of Afghanistan.
 (April 2017)

James Walton is a writer and broadcaster. He is the editor of The Faber Book of Smoking and the author of the literary quiz book Who Killed Iago?
 (July 2017)