Contents


Cool, Sublime, Idealistic Diebenkorn

Matisse/Diebenkorn an exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, October 23, 2016–January 29, 2017; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, March 11–May 29, 2017

Richard Diebenkorn: The Catalogue Raisonné edited by Jane Livingston and Andrea Liguori

Richard Diebenkorn: The Sketchbooks Revealed edited by the Cantor Arts Center

Is Europe Disintegrating?

Europe Since 1989: A History by Philipp Ther, translated from the German by Charlotte Hughes-Kreutzmüller

The Euro: How a Common Currency Threatens the Future of Europe by Joseph E. Stiglitz

Europe Entrapped by Claus Offe

The Euro Trap: On Bursting Bubbles, Budgets, and Beliefs by Hans-Werner Sinn

Der Euro: Von der Friedensidee zum Zankapfel by Hans-Werner Sinn

La fin du rêve européen by François Heisbourg

What Is Populism? by Jan-Werner Müller

The Caliphate: From Grand to Sordid

Caliphate: The History of an Idea by Hugh Kennedy

Salafi-Jihadism: The History of an Idea by Shiraz Maher

The Master Plan: ISIS, al-Qaeda, and the Jihadi Strategy for Final Victory by Brian H. Fishman

The Genius of Blackness

Kerry James Marshall: Mastry an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, April 23–September 25, 2016; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, October 25, 2016–January 29, 2017; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, March 12–July 2, 2017

Emily: The Quiet Earthquake

Emily Dickinson’s Poems As She Preserved Them edited by Cristanne Miller

A Quiet Passion a film directed by Terence Davies

Amherst by William Nicholson

A Loaded Gun: Emily Dickinson for the 21st Century by Jerome Charyn

Contributors

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as many works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003.
 (January 2017)

Hugh Eakin has previously written on Denmark and Norway for The New York Review. (January 2017)

Carlotta Gall is the North Africa Correspondent for The New York Times and the author of The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001–2014.
 (January 2017)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World.
 (January 2017)

James Gleick’s most recent book is Time Travel: A History. (January 2017)

Annette Gordon-Reed is Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard Law School and Professor of History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard. She is the author of, among other books, The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family, which won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 2009, and “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs”: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination, with Peter S. Onuf. Her essay in this issue was written at Hedgebrook in Washington State, a retreat for women writers.
 (January 2017)

Ian Johnson reports from Beijing and Berlin. His new book, The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, was published in April. He received the 2016 Shorenstein Journalism Award.
 (June 2017)

Lewis Lockwood is an Emeritus Professor of Music at Harvard and Co-Director of the Boston University Center for Beethoven Research. A paperback edition of his book Beethoven’s Symphonies: An Artistic Vision will be published in February.
 (January 2017)

Eric Maskin teaches economics and mathematics at Harvard. He was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 2007. (June 2017)

Anka Muhlstein was awarded the Prix Goncourt in 1996 for her biography of Astolphe de Custine, and has twice received the History Prize of the French Academy. Her essay in the January 19, 2017 issue is drawn from her new book, The Pen and the Brush: How Passion for Art Shaped ­Nineteenth-Century French Novels, which will be published by Other Press in January. (January 2017)

Paul Muldoon is the Howard Clark University Professor at ­Princeton and the Poetry Editor at The New Yorker. His most recent book is Selected Poems: 1968–2014. (January 2017)

Jay Neugeboren is the author of twenty-two books of fiction and nonfiction, including the memoir Imagining Robert: My Brother, Madness, and Survival and, most recently, the novel Max Baer and the Star of David. (January 2017)

Jed Perl’s Calder: The Conquest of Time, the first volume of his biography of the American sculptor, will be published in October. (May 2017)

Darryl Pinckney’s latest book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (June 2017)

Malise Ruthven’s books include Islam in the World, Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning, and Encounters with Islam: On Religion, Politics and Modernity. (June 2017)

Frederick Seidel’s latest book of poems is Widening Income Inequality. (June 2017)

Amartya Sen teaches economics and philosophy at Harvard. He was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1998. (June 2017)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (April 2017)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair! (October 2016)