Contents


The Partisan

Essays on Literature and Politics 1932-1972 by Philip Rahv, edited by Arabel J. Porter and Andrew J. Dvosin, with a memoir by Mary McCarthy

Hello and Goodbye

Murmurs of Earth: The Voyager Interstellar Record by Carl Sagan and F.D. Drake and Ann Druyan and Timothy Ferris and Jon Lomberg and Linda Salzman Sagan

Spaceships of the Mind by Nigel Calder

In the Center of Immensities by Bernard Lovell, edited by Ruth Nanda Anshen

American Prophet

The Radical Will: Randolph Bourne Selected Writings, 1911-1918 edited and with an introduction by Olaf Hansen, preface by Christopher Lasch

Contributors

Frederick C. Crews’s new book, Freud: The Making of an Illusion, will be published in the fall.
 (February 2017)

Nigel Dennis (1912–1989) was an English writer, critic and editor. His books include Boys and Girls Come Out to Play and An Essay on Malta.

Thomas R. Edwards (1928–2005) was Professor of English at Rutgers and editor of Raritan. His last book was Over Here: Criticizing America.

Martin Gardner (1914–2010) was a science writer and novelist. He was the author of The New Ambidextrous Universe, Fractal Music, Hypercards and More, The Night is Large and Visitors from Oz.

Clive James is the author of many books of criticism, autobiography, fiction, and poetry. Among his books are Cultural Amnesia: Necessary Memories from History and the Arts, The Blaze of Obscurity, and A Point of View.

Lincoln Kirstein (1907–1996) was a writer and ballet critic. In 1946, together with George Balanchine, Kirstein founded the Ballet Society, which would soon be renamed The New York City Ballet. In 1984 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Robert Mazzocco (1932–2017) was an American poet and critic.

Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor Emeritus of Social Science at Columbia and the author of The Anatomy of Fascism, Vichy France, and, with Michael Marrus, Vichy France and the Jews, among other works. (May 2018)

Alastair Reid (1926 -2014) was a poet, prose chronicler, translator, and traveler. Born in Scotland, he came to the United States in the early 1950s, began publishing his poems in The New Yorker in 1951, and for the next fifty-odd years was a traveling correspondent for that magazine. Having lived in both Spain and Latin America for long spells, he was a constant translator of poetry from the Spanish language, in particular the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Pablo Neruda. He published more than forty books, among them two word books for children, Ounce Dice Trice, with drawings by Ben Shahn, and Supposing…, with drawings by Bob Gill, both available from The New York Review Children’s Collection.