Contents


The Angels and Devils of Dickens

Dickens by Peter Ackroyd

The Invisible Woman: The Story of Nelly Ternan and Charles Dickens by Claire Tomalin

Mark Twain’s Aquarium: The Samuel Clemens ‘Angelfish’ Correspondence, 1905–1910 edited by John Cooley

Victorian Subjects by J. Hillis Miller

Dickens and the 1830s by Kathryn Chittick

A Star is Born

You’ll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again by Julia Phillips

How Green Was My Valley: The Screenplay for the Darryl F. Zanuck Film Production Directed by John Ford by Philip Dunne

‘The Final Secret of the Universe’?

Lonely Hearts of the Cosmos: The Scientific Quest for the Secret of the Universe by Dennis Overbye

The Big Bang Never Happened: A Startling Refutation of the Dominant Theory of the Origin of the Universe by Eric J. Lerner

Origins: The Lives and Worlds of Modern Cosmologists by Alan Lightman and Roberta Brawer

Decadence Revisited

Alexander to Actium: The Historical Evolution of the Hellenistic Age by Peter Green

The Hellenistic Aesthetic by Barbara Hughes Fowler

Hellenistic Poetry: An Anthology selected and translated by Barbara Hughes Fowler

Hellenism in Late Antiquity by G.W. Bowersock

Greek Sculpture by Andrew Stewart

Contributors

Robert M. Adams (1915-1996) was a founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rutgers, Cornell and U.C.L.A. His scholarly interested ranged from Milton to Joyce, and his translations of many classic works of French literature continue to be read to this day.

Robert Darnton’s A Literary Tour de France: The World of Books on the Eve of the French Revolution was published in February. He is the Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian Emeritus at Harvard. (June 2018)

David Brion Davis was Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

John Gregory Dunne (1932–2003) was a novelist, screenwriter and critic. His final novel is entitled Nothing Lost.

James Fallows is National Correspondent for The Atlantic.His books include Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel, Blind into Baghdad: America’s War in Iraq, and China Airborne.

Jamey Gambrell is a writer on Russian art and culture. She has translated works by Marina Tsvetaeva and Tatyana Tolstaya, in addition to Vladimir Sorokin’s three-volume Ice Trilogy and his Day of the ­Oprichnik. Her translation of Sorokin’s novel The Blizzard will be published in December 2015.


Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Daniel J. Kevles is Stanley Woodward Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and a visiting scholar at NYU Law School and Columbia Law School. He is completing a book on the history of innovation and intellectual property protection in plants, animals, and medical biology.
 (February 2019)

Edward Mortimer was until 2006 the Director of Communications in the Executive Office of the United Nations Secretary-General. He is a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and Senior Vice President and Chief Program Officer at the Salzburg Global Seminar. (April 2008)

Aryeh Neier is President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. His most recent book is The International Human Rights Movement: A History. (February 2018)

David J. Rothman is Bernard Schoenberg Professor of Social Medicine and History at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons and president of the Institute on Medicine as a Professor.

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

Garry Wills’s most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (November 2019)