Contents


Venice: The Masters in Boston

Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice an exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, March 15–August 16, 2009, and the Louvre, Paris, September 14, 2009–January 4, 2010

Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice an exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, March 15–August 16, 2009, and the Louvre, Paris, September 14, 2009–January 4, 2010

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and a Professor of Practice at the London School of Economics’ Institute of Global Affairs. Her latest book is Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine.
 (June 2019)

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland, and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.
 (April 2019)

Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a philosopher and historian of ideas who held the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory at Oxford. The final volume of his correspondence, Affirming: Letters 1975–1997, was published in December 2015.

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. His recent books include The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke and Moral Imagination, a collection of essays.
 (November 2018)

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts. He is the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio, among other books.
 (January 2018)

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial. He teaches at Wellesley.
 (June 2019)

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as numerous works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. His story in this issue is adapted from Moral Tales, a forthcoming collection. (December 2017)

Michael Greenberg is the author of Hurry Down Sunshine and Beg, Borrow, and Steal: A Writer’s Life.
 (January 2019)

Claire Messud’s latest novel is The Burning Girl. (March 2019)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Out of My Head: On the Trail of Consciousness and the novel In Extremis.
 (May 2019)

Amartya Sen teaches economics and philosophy at Harvard. He was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1998. (June 2017)

Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University, England. His latest book is How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life with Edward Skidelsky. He is the author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes.
 (April 2014)

Timothy Snyder is the Levin Professor of History at Yale, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a permanent fellow of the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. Among his many books are: Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin (2010), Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning (2015), On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (2017, and, most recently, The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America.
 (May 2019)

Paul Starr is Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Prince­ton and author of The Creation of the Media: Political Origins of Modern Communications. His next book, Entrenchment: Wealth, Power, and the Constitution of Democratic Societies, will be published in May. (March 2019)

Derek Walcott is a poet, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. (November 2016)

Blair Worden is Hugh Trevor-Roper’s literary executor. His most recent book is God’s Instruments: Political Conduct in the England of Oliver Cromwell. (January 2014)