Contents


What Is an Andy Warhol?

I Sold Andy Warhol (Too Soon) by Richard Polsky

Andy Warhol by Arthur C. Danto

Pop: The Genius of Andy Warhol by Tony Scherman and David Dalton

Joe Simon-Whelan et al. v. the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., et al.

Freedom Through Cooking

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham

Finding Our Tongues: Mothers, Infants, and the Origins of Language by Dean Falk

Who Was the Most Famous of All?

Joseph Jefferson: Dean of the American Theatre by Arthur W. Bloom

The Man Who Was Rip Van Winkle: Joseph Jefferson and Nineteenth-Century American Theatre by Benjamin McArthur

The Autobiography of Joseph Jefferson by Joseph Jefferson

The Dear, Dear Friend

The Ballad of Dorothy Wordsworth: A Life by Frances Wilson

The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals by Dorothy Wordsworth, edited and with an introduction and notes by Pamela Woof

Contributors

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. He is the author of What Is Painting? (January 2019)

Richard Dorment was the art critic for the Daily Telegraph between 1986 and 2015.

Elizabeth Drew is the author of fourteen books, including Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, which was expanded and reissued in 2014.

Hugh Eakin is the Gilder Lehrman Fellow in American History at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. (November 2017)

Robert Gottlieb has been the Editor in Chief of ­Simon and Schuster and of Knopf, and the Editor of The New Yorker. His most recent book is a collection of essays, Near-Death Experiences…and Others. (July 2019)

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek Bureau Chief and Correspondent-­at-Large in Africa and the Middle East. His latest book is The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu and Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts. Travel for his story in this issue was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. (April 2018)

J. Hoberman’s Make My Day: Movie Culture in the Age of Reagan will be published in July. (March 2019)

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Karl Kirchwey is Associate Dean of Faculty for the Humanities at Boston University, where he teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing. His most recent book is Stumbling Blocks: Roman Poems. 
He edited the Everyman’s Library Pocket Poets volume Poems of Rome. (April 2019)

Adam Kirsch is a poet and critic. His selection of Lionel Trilling’s letters, Life in Culture, was published in September.
 (December 2018)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Bei Ling, a poet and essayist, is a founder and editor of Qing Xiang, an exile literary journal founded in 1993, now based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and published in Chinese. He is also the founder and Executive Director of the Independent Chinese PEN Center, an organization of Chinese writers and intellectuals dedicated to the freedom of expression.
 (October 2009)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Daniel Mendelsohn is Editor-at-Large at The New York ­Review and Professor of Humanities at Bard. His new collection of essays, ­Ecstasy and Terror: From the Greeks to Game of Thrones, will be published in October.
 (April 2019)

Claire Messud’s latest novel is The Burning Girl. (March 2019)

Steven Mithen is Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Early Prehistory at the University of Reading. His books include The Prehistory of the Mind, After the Ice: A Global Human History, The Singing Neanderthals, and, most recently, Thirst: Water and Power in the Ancient World.
 (November 2016)

Norman Rush’s most recent novel is Subtle Bodies. (April 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. Come Closer and Listen, his latest book of poems, will be out next year. (August 2018)

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. His new book is If We Can Keep It: How the Republic ­Collapsed, and How It Might Be Saved. (July 2019)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Lawrence Weschler is the Director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University. Earlier this year he published True to Life: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with David Hockney and an expanded edition of Seeing Is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees: Over Thirty Years of Conversationswith Robert Irwin. (October 2009)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft’s books include The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair! His new book, Churchill’s Bust, will be published next year. (March 2019)