Contents


Who Resisted the Nazis?

The Resistance in Western Europe, 1940–1945 by Olivier Wieviorka, translated from the French by Jane Marie Todd, with a foreword by Robert O. Paxton

Sudden Courage: Youth in France Confront the Germans, 1940–1945 by Ronald C. Rosbottom

Defying Hitler: The Germans Who Resisted Nazi Rule by Gordon Thomas and Greg Lewis

Last Letters: The Prison Correspondence, September 1944–January 1945 by Freya and Helmuth James von Moltke, edited by Helmuth Caspar von Moltke, Dorothea von Moltke, and Johannes von Moltke, translated from the German by Shelley Frisch and with an afterword by Rachel Seiffert

Spellbound

Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World by Radcliffe G. Edmonds III

The Opposite of Ordinary

Cunningham a documentary film directed by Alla Kovgan

Dancing with Merce Cunningham by Marianne Preger-Simon, with a foreword by Stuart Hodes and an afterword by Alastair Macaulay

Diary: How to Improve the World (You Will Only Make Matters Worse) by John Cage, edited by Joe Biel and Richard Kraft, with an afterword by David W. Rose

Love, Icebox: Letters from John Cage to Merce Cunningham with a foreword, commentary, and afterword by Laura Kuhn

Merce Cunningham: After the Arbitrary by Carrie Noland

What Is College Worth?

The College Dropout Scandal by David Kirp

The Impoverishment of the American College Student by James V. Koch

Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy by Tressie McMillan Cottom

The Years That Matter Most: How College Makes or Breaks Us by Paul Tough

Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost by Caitlin Zaloom

Contributors

Peter C. Baker is a freelance writer in Evanston, Illinois. His pieces have been published in The Guardian, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and elsewhere. (July 2020)

Christopher Benfey is the Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of five books, including Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay: Reflections on Art, Family, and Survival and, most recently, IF: The Untold Story of Kipling’s American Years. (July 2020)

April Bernard’s most recent books are Miss Fuller, a novel, and Brawl & Jag, a collection of poems. (July 2020)

Christopher R. Browning is Frank Porter Graham Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author of Ordinary Men: Reserve Police ­Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland. (July 2020)

Robyn Creswell is an Assistant Professor of Comparative ­Literature at Yale. He is the author of City of Beginnings: Poetic Modernism in Beirut. (July 2020)

Carl Elliott is a Professor at the University of Minnesota and the recipient of a 2018 Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Humanities Public Scholar Award. He is working on a book about whistleblowers and unethical medical research. (July 2020)

Noah Feldman is the Felix Frankfurter Professor at Harvard Law School, a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, and host of the podcast Deep Background. His most recent book is The Arab Winter: A Tragedy.
 (July 2020)

Enrique Krauze is the author of Mexico: Biography of Power and Editor-in-Chief of the magazine Letras Libres, published in Mexico City and Madrid. Daniel Hahn is the writer, editor, or translator of seventy books. His most recent translation, of Juan Pablo Villalobos’s 
I Don’t Expect Anyone to Believe Me, was published in May. (July 2020)

Hari Kunzru’s latest novel, Red Pill, and his new podcast, Into the Zone, have just been released.
 (September 2020)

Diarmaid MacCulloch is Emeritus Professor of the History of the Church at Oxford. His History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years won the 2010 Cundill Prize; he was knighted in 2012. His Thomas Cromwell: A Life was published in 2018. (July 2020)

Peter Nabokov is a Professor of World Arts and Cultures/Dance and American Indian Studies at UCLA. His most recent book is How the World Moves: The Odyssey of an American Indian Family.
 (July 2020)

Jessica Riskin teaches History at Stanford. Her latest book is The Restless Clock: A History of the Centuries-Long Argument Over What Makes Living Things Tick. (July 2020)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor of History and Classics at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest books are The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney, and The Divine Spark of Syracuse. (August 2020)

Walter M. Shaub Jr. is a Senior Adviser to Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonprofit watchdog group promoting integrity in government. He was formerly the Director of the US Office of Government Ethics and a member of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency. (July 2020)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. His book If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed, and How It Might Be Saved will be published in paperback in June. (July 2020)

Marina Warner is a Distinguished Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, Professor of English and Creative Writing at Birkbeck College, University of London, and President of the Royal Society of Literature. Her books include Alone of All Her Sex: The Myth and the Cult of the Virgin Mary, Once Upon a Time: A Short History of Fairy Tale, and Stranger Magic: Charmed States and the Arabian Nights. A memoir of her childhood in Cairo, Inventory of a Life Mislaid, will be published next spring. (July 2020)

Clair Wills is the King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at the University of Cambridge. (August 2020)

Brenda Wineapple’s most recent book, The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation, was just published in paperback. (July 2020)

Jonathan Zimmerman is a Professor of History of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. His next book, The Amateur Hour: A History of College Teaching in America, will be published in the fall.
 (July 2020)