Contents


Nabokov’s Way

The Waltz Invention by Vladimir Nabokov

The Eye by Vladimir Nabakov

Despair by Vladimir Nabokov

Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited by Vladimir Nabokov

Escape Into Aesthetics: The Art of Vladimir Nabokov by Page Stegner

The Divided Catholics

The Fourth Session by Xavier Rynne

What Happened at Rome? The Council and Its Implications for the Modern World by Gary MacEoin

Pope Paul VI: Apostle on the Move by Alden Hatch

Boney

The Bonapartes by David Stacton

Napoleon’s Russian Campaign by Count Philippe-Paul de Ségur, translated by J. David Townsend, with a new Introduction by Peter Gay

1812 by Anthony Brett James

The Campaigns of Napoleon by David Chandler

Napoleon’s Satellite Kingdoms by Owen Connelly

Napoleon and the Birth of Modern Spain by Gabriel H. Lovett

Contributors

D.J. Enright (1920–2002) was a British poet, novelist and critic. He held teaching positions in Egypt, Japan, Thailand, Singapore and the United Kingdom. In 1981 Enright was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Paul Goodman (1911–1972) was an American social critic, psychologist, poet, novelist, and anarchist. His writings appeared in Politics, Partisan Review, The New Republic, Commentary, The New Leader, Dissent, and The New York Review of Books. He published several well-regarded books in a variety of fields—including city planning, Gestalt therapy, literary criticism, and politics—before Growing Up Absurd, cancelled by its original publisher and turned down by a number of other presses, was brought out by Random House in 1960.

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916–2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Ted Hughes’s translation of Racine’s Phèdre will be staged at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in January and published that month. His translation of the complete Oresteia, of which the poem in this issue is the opening, will be staged by the National Theatre in England and published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in June. His last book was Birthday Letters. He died on October 28. (December 1998)

J.H. Plumb (1911–2001) was a British historian. He taught at Cambridge and Columbia. Plumb was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1968 and was knighted in 1982. His works include England in the Eighteenth Century, The Making of a Historian,and The American Experience.

John Richardson’s four-volume Life of Picasso is due to be finished this year. (May 2016)

Christopher Ricks teaches at Boston University in the Core Curriculum and the Editorial Institute and is a former president of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers. From 2004 to 2009 he was Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford. His recent books include True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Lowell Under the Sign of Eliot and Pound and Decisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot.