Contents


Who Killed Soviet Communism?

The August Coup: The Truth and the Lessons by Mikhail Gorbachev

Gorbachev’s Endgame’ by Jerry F. Hough

Liberalization and Democratization in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe’

Broken Glass

Strindberg’s Letters Vol. I: 1862–1892 Vol. II: 1892–1912 selected, edited, and translated by Michael Robinson

Africa’s Lost History

The African Experience: Major Themes in African History from Earliest Times to the Present by Roland Oliver

The Scramble for Africa: The White Man’s Conquest of the Dark Continent from 1876 to 1912 by Thomas Pakenham

The Master Builder

Karl Friedrich Schinkel: A Universal Man 31–October 27, 1991 An exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, July

Karl Friedrich Schinkel: A Universal Man Catalog of the exhibition, edited by Michael Snodin

Karl Friedrich Schinkel by Helmut Börsch-Supan

Collection of Architectural Designs, including designs which have been executed and objects whose execution was intended by Karl Friedrich Schinkel

Reise nach England, Schottland und Paris im Jahre 1826 by Karl Friedrich Schinkel, edited with an introduction and notes by Gottfried Riemann, an essay by David Bindmann

What Ever Happened to the ‘War on Drugs’?

The Search for Rational Drug Control by Franklin E. Zimring, by Gordon Hawkins

Cocaine Changes: The Experience of Using and Quitting by Dan Waldorf, by Craig Reinarman, by Sheigla Murphy

Dead on Delivery: Inside the Drug Wars, Straight from the Street by Robert M. Stutman, by Richard Esposito

Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results by Mark A. R. Kleiman

Pipe Dream Blues: Racism and the War on Drugs by Clarence Lusane, with Dennis Desmond

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


Jorge Luis Borges (1899–1986) was an Argentine short story writer, poet, and essayist. His fiction, which drew on his interest in mathematics and detective stories, made him one of the influential writers of the twentieth century. English-language anthologies of his stories include Ficciones, The Aleph, and Labyrinths.

Joseph Brodsky (1940–1996) was a Russian poet and essayist. Born in Leningrad, Brodsky moved to the United States when he was exiled from Russia in 1972. His poetry collections include A Part of Speech andTo Urania; his essay collections include Less Than One, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Watermark. In 1987, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. He served as US Poet Laureate from 1991 to 1992.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)