Contents


Flights

My Father’s Tears and Other Stories by John Updike

Endpoint and Other Poems by John Updike

The Maples Stories by John Updike

The Late Show

Picasso: Mosqueteros an exhibition, curated by John Richardson, at the Gagosian Gallery, New York City, March 26–June 6, 2009

The Admirable Mrs. James

Alice in Jamesland: The Story of Alice Howe Gibbens James by Susan E. Gunter

House of Wits: An Intimate Portrait of the James Family by Paul Fisher

Contributors

Hussein Agha is Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and coauthor of A Framework for a Palestinian National Security Doctrine. (November 2012)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Julian Barnes’s most recent books are Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art and The Noise of Time, a novel.
 (April 2017)

Charles Baxter is the Edelstein-Keller Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Minnesota. His latest book is There’s Something I Want You to Do: Stories. (April 2017)

Bill Bradley served as US Senator for New Jersey from 1979 to 1997. He is a managing director at the merchant bank Allen & Co. His most recent book is The New American Story. (June 2009)

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Augustine of Hippo: A Biography and, most recently, Treasure in Heaven: The Holy Poor in Early Christianity. (October 2017)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa.

Niall Ferguson is Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World. (June 2009)

Martin Filler is the 2017 recipient of the Stephen A. Kliment ­Oculus Award, given by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, for his architecture criticism, which has appeared in these pages since 1985.
 (August 2017)

Max Hastings is the author of many books on military history, including Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War and Inferno: The World at War, 1939–45. His new book, Vietnam: An Epic Tragedy, 1945–75, will be published next year.

 (October 2017)

Adam Kirsch is a poet and critic. His most recent book is The Global Novel: Writing the World in the 21st Century. (June 2017)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (July 2016)

Robert Malley is Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group. He is writing here in his personal capacity. (November 2012)

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His latest book, On Betrayal, was published in February.
 (March 2017)

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org, the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury, and the author, most recently, of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. (February 2017)

Ahmed Rashid is the author of Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan and several books on Afghanistan and Central Asia. He lives in Lahore. (November 2016)

Christopher Ricks teaches at Boston University in the Core Curriculum and the Editorial Institute and is a former president of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers. From 2004 to 2009 he was Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford. His recent books include True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Lowell Under the Sign of Eliot and Pound and Decisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot.

Nouriel Roubini is Distinguished Professor of Economics at New York University’s Stern School of Business and chairman of RGE Monitor, an economic consultancy firm. (June 2009)

Jennifer Schuessler is an editor at The New York Times Book Review. (March 2011)

George Soros is chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. (November 2016)

Jonathan Sumption’s history of the Hundred Years–? War, Divided Houses, will be published in September. (June 2009)

Colin Thubron is a President Emeritus of the Royal Society of Literature and the author of The Lost Heart of Asia, Shadow of the Silk Road, and, most recently, Night of Fire, a novel. (October 2017)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is the novel House of Names. (July 2017)

Michael Walzer is Professor Emeritus in the School of ­Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and co-­editor emeritus of Dissent. His new book, A Foreign Policy for the Left, will be published in the fall. (May 2017)

Stanley Wells is Honorary President of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and an Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His two new books, Great Shakespeare Actors: From Burbage to Branagh and William Shakespeare: A Very Short Introduction, are to be published in June and September of this year. (March 2015)

Robin Wells is the coauthor, along with Paul Krugman, of Economics and has taught economics at Princeton, Stanford Business School, and MIT.
 (July 2012)

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (December 2017)