Contents


Smash It: Who Cares?

Time Honored: A Global View of Architectural Conservation by John H. Stubbs

Architectural Conservation in Europe and the Americas by John H. Stubbs and Emily G. Makaš

Saving Wright: The Freeman House and the Preservation of Meaning, Materials, and Modernity by Jeffrey M. Chusid

Expect to Be Lied to in Japan

Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World by John W. Dower

Strong in the Rain: Surviving Japan’s Earthquake, Tsunami, and Fukushima Nuclear Disaster by David McNeill and Lucy Birmingham

Contributors

Hussein Agha is Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and coauthor of A Framework for a Palestinian National Security Doctrine. (November 2012)

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. His two new books, The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke: From the Sublime and Beautiful to American Independence and Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, were published earlier this year.
 (December 2014)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.


David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review. She is the author of several books about money in politics, including Politics and Money: The New Road to Corruption, The Corruption of ­American Politics: What Went Wrong and Why, and Citizen McCain.
 (June 2015)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied. Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), The Scientist as Rebel (2006, published by New York Review Books), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). New York Review Books will publish Dreams of Earth and Sky, a new collection of Dyson’s essays, in April 2015. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Jonathan Galassi’s novel, Muse, will be published in June. His recent collection of poems is Left-Handed. (February 2015)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His most recent book is Great ­Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens.
 (June 2015)

Allan Gurganus is the author of Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All and The Practical Heart. His next work of fiction, Local Souls, will be published in 2013.
 (November 2012)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech 
and Le Divorce, among other novels. Her most recent book is 
Flyover Lives.


Robert Malley is Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group. He is writing here in his personal capacity. (November 2012)

Don Paterson’s latest book of poetry is Rain. (November 2012)

Hayden Pelliccia is a Professor of Classics at Cornell. (November 2012)

Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and, in the Alain Locke Lecture Series, Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. His new book is Blackballed: The Black Vote and US Democracy.


Rachel Polonsky is an Affiliated Lecturer in Slavonic Studies at the University of Cambridge. Her latest book is Molotov’s Magic Lantern: A Journey in Russian History. (December 2013)

Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer 
at Bard. Her new novel is Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932.

Frank Rich is a writer-at-large for New York magazine. His books include Ghost Light, a memoir, and The Greatest Story Ever Sold: The Decline and Fall of Truth in Bush’s America. He is an Executive Producer of the HBO series Veep.

Jeffrey D. Sachs is Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia. He is the author most recently of The Price of Civilization: Reawakening American Virtue and Prosperity and To Move the World: JFK’s Quest for Peace. (February 2014)

James J. Sheehan is the Dickason Professor in the Humanities at Stanford. His latest book is Where Have All the Soldiers Gone? The Transformation of Modern Europe.
 (November 2012)

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. His new book, with Reid Hastie, is Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter. (April 2015)

Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfillment in Early Modern England.

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas.
 (June 2015)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book for general readers is Lake Views: This World and the Universe.

Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory. He is the author of The Future of the Catholic Church with Pope Francis.