Contents


The Mental Life of Plants and Worms, Among Others

The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms: with Observations on Their Habits by Charles Darwin

Jelly-Fish, Star-Fish, and Sea-Urchins: Being a Research on Primitive Nervous Systems by George John Romanes

Mental Evolution in Animals by George John Romanes

In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind by Eric R. Kandel

What a Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses by Daniel Chamovitz

The Foundations of Ethology by Konrad Lorenz

Behavior of the Lower Organisms by Herbert Spencer Jennings

Cephalopod Behaviour by Roger T. Hanlon and John B. Messenger

An Introduction to Nervous Systems by Ralph J. Greenspan

The Gift of Piero

Piero della Francesca: Personal Encounters an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, January 14–March 30, 2014

The Reckless Founding Formalist

Shklovsky: Witness to an Era by Serena Vitale, translated from the Italian by Jamie Richards

Theory of Prose by Viktor Shklovsky, translated from the Russian by Benjamin Sher, with an introduction by Gerald L. Bruns

A Sentimental Journey: Memoirs, 1917–1922 by Viktor Shklovsky, translated from the Russian by Richard Sheldon, with introductions by Richard Sheldon and Sidney Monas

Zoo, or Letters Not About Love by Viktor Shklovsky, translated from the Russian and with an introduction by Richard Sheldon

Contributors

John Ashbery is the author of several books of poetry, including Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975), which received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the National Book Award. His first collection, Some Trees (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. He has also published art criticism, plays, and a novel. From 1990 until 2008 Ashbery was the Charles P. Stevenson, Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Ashbery’s most recent collection of poetry is Quick Question. His Collected French Translations will be published in April 2014 in two volumes, one of Prose and one of Poetry.

Elaine Blair is a regular contributor to The New York Review. (April 2014)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His latest book, The Throne of Adulis: Red Sea Wars on the Eve of Islam, was published last year. (April 2014)

Leo Carey is a Senior Editor at The New Yorker. (April 2014)

Joel E. Cohen is Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of ­Populations at the Rockefeller University and Columbia University and the author of How Many People Can the Earth Support?
 (April 2014)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine.

Keith Gessen is a founding editor of n+1 and the editor and cotranslator of Kirill Medvedev’s It’s No Good.


Peter Green is Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin and Adjunct Professor at the University of Iowa. His most recent book is The Hellenistic Age: A Short History. (April 2014)

Michael Greenberg is the author of Hurry Down Sunshine and Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer’s Life. (April 2014)

Jeff Madrick is Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz ­Rediscovery Government Initiative at the Century Foundation, Editor of Challenge Magazine, and teaches at the Cooper Union. His forthcoming book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Econ­omists Damaged America and the World, to be published in the fall of 2014.

J.D. McClatchy is an American poet and librettist. He is 
­Editor of The Yale Review. His most recent book is Plundered Hearts: New and Selected Poems.
 (April 2014)

Colin McGinn is a philosopher whose books include The ­Character of Mind, The Problem of Consciousness, Consciousness and Its Objects, and The Meaning of Disgust.

 (April 2014)

Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of ten books, the most recent of which is Hallucinations. He is a professor of ­neurology at NYU School of Medicine and a visiting professor at the University of Warwick.


Cathleen Schine is the author of several novels, including Rameau’s Niece, The Love Letter, She is Me, The New Yorkers, and The Three Weissmanns of Westport. Her latest novel, Fin & Lady, was published in July 2013. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

Gregor Peter Schmitz is ­Europe correspondent of Der Spiegel and coauthor with George ­Soros of The Tragedy of the European Union: Disintegration or Revival? (April 2014)

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (April 2014)

David Shulman is the Renee Lang Professor of Humanistic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an activist in Ta’ayush, Arab-Jewish Partnership. His latest book is More than Real: A History of the Imagination in South India.

 
(April 2014)

George Soros is Chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. (April 2014)

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. His new books are Why Nudge? and Conspiracy ­Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas.
 (April 2014)

Paul Wilson is a writer based in Toronto. He has translated major works by Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Klíma, Bohumil Hrabal, and Václav Havel into English.
 (April 2014)

Robert Winter, Distinguished Professor of Music and holder of the Presidential Chair in Music and Interactive Arts at UCLA, is currently preparing for release Music in the Air, the first completely interactive history of Western music. He contributed to the article on performing practice in The New Grove Dictionary of Music.
 (April 2014)

Ruth Bernard Yeazell is Chace Family Professor of ­English at Yale. Her books include Art of the Everyday: Dutch Painting and the Realist Novel and Fictions of Modesty: Women and Courtship in the English Novel. (April 2014)

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.