Contents


Botticelli: Love, Wisdom, Terror

Botticelli and Treasures from the Hamilton Collection an exhibition at the Kupferstichkabinett, Berlin, October 16, 2015–January 24, 2016; and the Courtauld Gallery, London, February 18–May 15, 2016

Botticelli Reimagined an exhibition at the Gemäldegalerie, Berlin, September 24, 2015–January 24, 2016; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, March 5–July 3, 2016

‘Going Dark’

Cyberphobia: Identity, Trust, Security and the Internet by Edward Lucas

The Future of Foreign Intelligence: Privacy and Surveillance in a Digital Age by Laura K. Donohue

The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age by Adam Segal

Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War by Fred Kaplan

Our Awful Prisons: How They Can Be Changed

Mr. Smith Goes to Prison: What My Year Behind Bars Taught Me About America’s Prison Crisis by Jeff Smith

Understanding Mass Incarceration: A People’s Guide to the Key Civil Rights Struggle of Our Time by James Kilgore

The First Civil Right: How Liberals Built Prison America by Naomi Murakawa

From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America by Elizabeth Hinton

Caught: The Prison State and the Lockdown of American Politics by Marie Gottschalk

Indonesia: The Battle Over Islam

Islamisation and Its Opponents in Java: A Political, Social, Cultural and Religious History, c. 1930 to the Present by M.C. Ricklefs

Islam in Indonesia: The Contest for Society, Ideas and Values by Carool Kersten

Islam and Democracy in Indonesia: Tolerance Without Liberalism by Jeremy Menchik

The Passions of Vargas Llosa

Notes on the Death of Culture: Essays on Spectacle and Society by Mario Vargas Llosa, edited and translated from the Spanish by John King

The Discreet Hero by Mario Vargas Llosa, translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman

A Wonderfully Ephemeral College

Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College, 1933–1957 an exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, October 10, 2015–January 24, 2016; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, February 21–May 14, 2016; and the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, September 17, 2016–January 1, 2017

Intersecting Colors: Josef Albers and His Contemporaries an exhibition at the Mead Art Museum, Amherst, Massachusetts, August 28, 2015–January 3, 2016

Contributors

John Banville’s most recent novel is The Blue Guitar. (August 2017)

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts. He is the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio, among other books. (May 2016)

Roger Cohen is a columnist for The New York Times. His most recent book is the memoir The Girl from Human Street: Ghosts of Memory in a Jewish Family. (May 2016)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

Eamon Duffy is Emeritus Professor of the History of ­Christianity at the University of Cambridge. His latest book is ­Reformation 
Divided: Catholics, Protestants and the Conversion of England. (April 2017)

Freeman Dyson is Professor of Physics Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His most recent book is Dreams of Earth and Sky, a collection of his writing in these pages. (October 2016)

Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author, most recently, of Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991: A History.
 (May 2017)

Anthony Gottlieb is the author of The Dream of Reason: A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance and a former Executive Editor of The Economist. His new book, The Dream of Enlightenment: The Rise of Modern Philosophy, will be published in August.
 (May 2016)

Michael Greenberg is the author of Hurry Down Sunshine and Beg, Borrow, and Steal: A Writer’s Life. 
(August 2017)

Linda Greenhouse is Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School. She writes an opinion column on the Supreme Court and law for The New York Times. Her new book, Just a Journalist, will be published in the fall.
 (April 2017)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. (July 2017)

Adam Hochschild’s books include King Leopold’s Ghost, To End All Wars, and Spain in Our Hearts: Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939, which was published in March. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.
 (May 2016)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (February 2017)

Phillip Lopate’s most recent book, A Mother’s Tale, was published in January. He is the Director of the nonfiction writing program at Columbia. (February 2017)

Jeff Madrick is the Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative at the Century Foundation and Editor of Challenge. His most recent book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Damaged America and the World.
 (June 2017)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. He is the author of The Phantom Empire and Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012, among other books. (April 2017)

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (August 2017)

Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer at Bard. Her new novel, Mister Monkey, was published last fall. (July 2017)

Nathaniel Rich is the author of Odds Against Tomorrow and The Mayor’s Tongue. (April 2017)

Charlie Savage is a Washington Correspondent for The New York Times. His latest book is Power Wars: Inside Obama’s Post–9/11 Presidency.
 (February 2017)

Margaret Scott was Cultural Editor of the Far Eastern Economic Review and has written about Indonesia for The New York Review and the Times Literary Supplement. She teaches at NYU’s Wagner School of Public Service.

 (October 2016)

Jane Yeh’s most recent collection of poems is The Ninjas. (May 2016)