Contents


Turner: High Ambition for Deep Truth

Turner: The Extraordinary Life and Momentous Times of J.M.W. Turner by Franny Moyle

J.M.W. Turner: A Life in Art, Vol. 1: Young Mr Turner: The First Forty Years, 1775–1815 by Eric Shanes

The Beautiful, Magical World of Rajput Art

Divine Pleasures: Painting from India’s Rajput Courts—The Kronos Collections an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, June 14–September 12, 2016

Poetry and Devotion in Indian Painting: Two Decades of Collecting an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, June 15–December 4, 2016

Contributors

Edward Ball is the author of Slaves in the Family and The Inventor and the Tycoon: The Murderer Eadweard Muybridge, the Entrepreneur Leland Stanford, and the Birth of Moving Pictures, among other books. He is a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. (March 2017)

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. A new ­rewritten edition of his book What Is Painting? will be published in October. (July 2017)

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

April Bernard’s most recent books are Brawl & Jag, a collection of poems, and Miss Fuller, a novel.
 (November 2016)

Christopher R. Browning is Frank Porter Graham ­Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author, most recently, of Remembering Survival: Inside a Nazi Slave-Labor Camp. (April 2017)

Ian Buruma will be the new editor of The New York Review of Books in September 2017. He has been a frequent contributor to the Review since 1985. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper ­Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern. (May 2017)

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is Codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (November 2016)

William Easterly is Professor of Economics at NYU and the author of The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor.
 (November 2016)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. (July 2017)

Richard Holmes books include Shelley, Footsteps, Coleridge, The Age of Wonder, and, most recently, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air. His memoir This Long Pursuit will be published next spring.
 (November 2016)

John Lanchester is the author of four novels and four books of nonfiction including, most recently, How to Speak Money: What the Money People Say—And What It Really Means. (November 2016)

Wendy Lesser is the Editor of The Threepenny Review and the author of ten books. Her eleventh, You Say to Brick: The Life of Louis Kahn, will be published next March.
 (November 2016)

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair at the University of California at Riverside. His recent books include An Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and a translation of the memoirs of the Chinese astrophysicist Fang Lizhi, entitled The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State. (November 2016)

Ligaya Mishan has written for The New Yorker and The New York Times. (November 2016)

Steven Mithen is Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Early Prehistory at the University of Reading. His books include The Prehistory of the Mind, After the Ice: A Global Human History, The Singing Neanderthals, and, most recently, Thirst: Water and Power in the Ancient World.
 (November 2016)

Gary Saul Morson is the Lawrence B. Dumas Professor of the Arts and Humanities and a Professor in the Slavic Languages and Literatures Department at Northwestern. His new book, Cents and Sensibility: What Economics Can Learn from the Humanities, cowritten with Morton Schapiro, will be published in June. (March 2017)

Peter Nabokov is a Professor in the Department of World Arts and Cultures at UCLA. His most recent book is How the World Moves: The Odyssey of an American Indian Family.
 (November 2016)

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist with The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg visiting lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His writings on Brexit have won both the European Press Prize and the Orwell Prize for journalism. (September 2017)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Jed S. Rakoff is a United States District Judge for the Southern District of New York. (June 2017)

Ahmed Rashid is the author of Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan and several books on Afghanistan and Central Asia. He lives in Lahore. (November 2016)

Malise Ruthven’s books include Islam in the World, Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning, and Encounters with Islam: On Religion, Politics and Modernity. (June 2017)

Nick Thorpe is the Central Europe Correspondent for BBC News and the author of The Danube, A Journey Upriver and ’89: The Unfinished Revolution. (November 2016)

Edmund White has written biographies of Jean Genet, Marcel Proust, and Arthur Rimbaud. His latest book is the novel Our Young Man.
 (September 2017)

Adam Zagajewski is a Polish poet and the author of 
twelve volumes of verse, seven of which have been translated into English. His new book, Slight Exaggeration: An Essay, was ­published in April. (May 2017)