Contents


The Bitter End

Armageddon: The Battle for Germany, 1944–1945 by Max Hastings

The End: Hamburg 1943 by Hans Erich Nossack, translated from the German and with a foreword by Joel Agee, and with photographs by Erich Andres

The Moment of Truth?

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell

The Wisdom Paradox: How Your Mind Can Grow Stronger as Your Brain Grows Older by Elkhonon Goldberg

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Christopher Benfey is the Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of five books about the American Gilded Age, including Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay: Reflections on Art, Family, and Survival (2012) and, most recently, IF: The Untold Story of Kipling’s American Years, published this month by Penguin.
 (July 2019)

Jeremy Bernstein is a theoretical physicist and the author, most recently, of A Bouquet of Numbers and Other Scientific Offerings, a collection of essays.
 (December 2016).

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Freeman Dyson is Professor of Physics Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.

Helen Epstein is Visiting Professor of Human Rights and Global Public Health at Bard. She is the author of Another Fine Mess: America, Uganda, and the War on Terror and The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa. She has served as a consultant for numerous organizations, including UNICEF, the World Bank, and Human Rights Watch. (October 2019)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. A new edition of his book The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague will be published this fall.
 (October 2019)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is a novel, ­Summer Hours at the Robbers Library.
 (December 2019)

Simon Head is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, and Director of Programs for the New York Review of Books Foundation. He is the author of Mindless: Why Smarter Machines Are Making Dumber Humans (2014).

Joseph Kerman is emeritus professor of music at the University of California, Berkeley. He began writing music criticism for The Hudson Review in the 1950s, and is a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books and many other journals. His books include Opera as Drama (1956; new and revised edition 1988), The Beethoven Quartets (1967), Contemplating Music (1986), Concerto Conversations (1999), and The Art of Fugue (2005).

John Lanchester is the author of four novels and four books of nonfiction including, most recently, How to Speak Money: What the Money People Say—And What It Really Means. (November 2016)

Andrew O’Hagan is the author, most recently, of The Secret Life: Three True Stories of the Digital Age and the novel The Illuminations. (November 2019)

Max Rodenbeck is the South Asia Bureau Chief for The Economist. (November 2019)

Alan Ryan is the author of On Tocqueville, On Marx, and the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought from Herodotus to the Present. 
(January 2018)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and ­William Nicholson. (December 2019)

Timothy Snyder is the Levin Professor of History at Yale, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a permanent fellow of the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. Among his many books are: Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin (2010), Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning (2015), On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (2017, and, most recently, The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America.
 (May 2019)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)