Contents


Lessons in Survival

Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore by Elizabeth Rush

The Geography of Risk: Epic Storms, Rising Seas, and the Cost of America’s Coasts by Gilbert M. Gaul

Back on Catfish Row

Porgy and Bess an opera by George Gershwin, DuBose and Dorothy Heyward, and Ira Gershwin, at the Metropolitan Opera, New York City, September 23, 2019–February 1, 2020

Summertime: George Gershwin’s Life in Music by Richard Crawford

The Liar’s Truth

The Impostor: A True Story by Javier Cercas, translated from the Spanish by Frank Wynne

Spaniards in Mauthausen: Representations of a Nazi Concentration Camp, 1940–2015 by Sara J. Brenneis

Spy vs. Spy

The Spy and the Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold War by Ben Macintyre

Contributors

Elizabeth Bruenig is an opinion columnist for The Washington Post. (November 2019)

Ariel Dorfman, a Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Literature at Duke, is the author of the play Death and the Maiden and of the forthcoming children’s story The Rabbits’ Rebellion and a novel, Cautivos, about Cervantes’s life in a jail in Seville. (November 2019)

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern ­History at Oxford. His books include Empires of the Atlantic World: ­Britain and Spain in America, 1492–1830 and, most ­recently, Scots and Catalans: Union and Disunion.
 (November 2019)

Tim Flannery’s Europe: A Natural History was published last year. (November 2019)

Peter W. Galbraith is a former US Ambassador to ­Croatia and Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations in Afghanistan. He is the author of two books on the Iraq War, The End of Iraq: How American Incompetence Created a War Without End and Unintended Consequences: How War in Iraq Strengthened America’s Enemies. (November 2019)

Alan Hollinghurst’s most recent novel, The Sparsholt Affair, was published in 2017. (November 2019)

Fred Kaplan is the national security columnist for Slate. 
His sixth book, The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War, will be published in January.
 (November 2019)

Robert Kuttner is a Cofounder and Coeditor of The American Prospect and a Professor at Brandeis’s Heller School. His latest book is The Stakes: 2020 and the Survival of American Democracy.
 (November 2019)

Ange Mlinko is a Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Florida. Her fifth book of poems is Distant Mandate.
 (November 2019)

Geoffrey O’Brien’s books include The Phantom Empire, Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012, and, most recently, the poetry collection The Blue Hill. 
(November 2019)

Emily Raboteau is the author of Searching for Zion: The Quest for Home in the African Diaspora, which won a 2014 American Book Award.
 She is a professor of English at the City College of New York. (November 2019)

Max Rodenbeck is the South Asia Bureau Chief for The Economist. (November 2019)

Frederick Seidel’s latest book of poems, Peaches Goes It Alone, was published last year. (November 2019)

Richard Sieburth is most recently the translator and editor of Henri Michaux’s A Certain Plume. (November 2019)

Xan Smiley, a former correspondent in Moscow and Washington, has been the Political Editor, the Europe Editor, and the Middle East and Africa Editor of The Economist. He is now its Editor at Large.
 (November 2019)

Zadie Smith’s new story collection, Grand Union, was published in October. (November 2019)

Jonathan Stevenson is a Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies and Managing Editor of Survival. He was National Security Council Director for ­Political-Military Affairs, Middle East and North Africa from 2011 to 2013. (November 2019)

James Walton is a writer and broadcaster. He is the editor of The Faber Book of Smoking and the author of the literary quiz books Who Killed Iago? and The Penguin Book Quiz: From the Very Hungry Caterpillar to Ulysses, which will be published in the US in January. (November 2019)