Contents


Gold & Geld

Gustav Klimt: The Ronald S. Lauder and Serge Sabarsky Collections Catalog of the exhibition edited by Renée Price, with contributions by Ronald S. Lauder and others.

Where Wonders Await Us

The Deep: The Extraordinary Creatures of the Abyss by Claire Nouvian

The Silent Deep: The Discovery, Ecology and Conservation of the Deep Sea by Tony Koslow

The Wand of the Enchanter

The Journal of Joyce Carol Oates, 1973–1982 edited by Greg Johnson

The Gravedigger’s Daughter by Joyce Carol Oates

The Museum of Dr. Moses: Tales of Mystery and Suspense by Joyce Carol Oates

Joyce Carol Oates: Conversations, 1970–2006 edited by Greg Johnson

At Home in Paradise

Boone: A Biography by Robert Morgan

Our Savage Neighbors: How Indian War Transformed Early America by Peter Silver

Daniel Boone: His Own Story by Daniel Boone

The Life of Daniel Boone by Lyman C. Draper, edited by Ted Franklin Belue

My Father, Daniel Boone: The Draper Interviews with Nathan Boone edited by Neal O. Hammon

A Sketch of the Life and Character of Daniel Boone by Peter Houston, edited by Ted Franklin Belue

The Strange Attractor: New and Selected Poems by Robert Morgan

The Mountains Won’t Remember Us and Other Stories by Robert Morgan

The Abstract Wild by Jack Turner

Iraq: The Hidden Human Costs

One Bullet Away: The Making of a Marine Officer by Nathaniel Fick

Generation Kill: Devil Dogs, Iceman, Captain America, and the New Face of American War by Evan Wright

House to House: An Epic Memoir of War by David Bellavia, with John R. Bruning

Chasing Ghosts: Failures and Facades in Iraq: A Soldier’s Perspective by Paul Rieckhoff

Love My Rifle More Than You: Young and Female in the US Army by Kayla Williams, with Michael E. Staub

Cobra II: The Inside Story of the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq by Michael R. Gordon and Bernard E. Trainor

Contributors

Madison Smartt Bell is Professor of English and Director of the Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College. His new book, DevilA?s Dream: A Novel About Nathan Bedford Forrest, is forthcoming in November. (October 2009)

Elaine Blair is a regular contributor to The New York Review. (July 2017)

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts. He is the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio, among other books. (May 2016)

Christian Caryl is the Editor of the DemocracyPost blog at The Washington Post and the author of Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the Twenty-first Century. (November 2017)

Michael Dirda is a columnist for The Washington Post Book World. His most recent book is Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books.
 (December 2016)

Richard J. Evans is Regius Professor Emeritus of ­History at the University of Cambridge and President of Wolfson College, Cambridge. He is the author of The Third Reich at War and, most 
recently, ­Altered Pasts.

Tim Flannery is the author of Chasing Kangaroos: A Continent, a Scientist, and a Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Creature and, most recently, Atmosphere of Hope: Searching for Solutions to the Climate 
Crisis.
 (December 2017)

Jorie Graham is the Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard. Her book Sea Change: Poems will be published next spring. (December 2007)

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek Bureau Chief and Correspondent-­at-Large in Africa and the Middle East. His most recent book is The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu and Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts. (June 2017)

Colin Jones is a professor of history at Queen Mary, University of London. His books include The Great Nation: France from Louis XV to Napoleon, Paris: Biography of a City, and The Smile Revolution in Eighteenth-Century France. (June 2017)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Simon Leys (1935–2014) was the pen name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian Na­tional University and was Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. Leys was a contributor to such publications as The New York Review of Books, Le Monde, and Le Figaro Littéraire, writing on literature and contemporary China. Among his books are Chinese Shadows, Other People’s Thoughts, and The Wreck of the Batavia & Prosper. In addition to The Death of Napoleon NYRB publishes The Hall of Uselessness, a collection of essays, and On the Abolition of All Political Parties, an essay by Simone Weil that Leys translated and edited. His many awards include the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Femina, the Prix Guizot, and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

Michael Massing, a former Executive Editor of The Columbia Journalism Review, frequently writes about the press.
 (January 2016)

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org, the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury, and the author, most recently, of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. (February 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is the novel House of Names. (July 2017)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (December 2017)