Contents


A Master in the Shadows

Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904–1965) an exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art, October 16, 2011–January 8, 2012, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, January 30–April 29, 2012

Bold When It Counted

The Tender Hour of Twilight: Paris in the ’50s, New York in the ’60s: A Memoir of Publishing’s Golden Age by Richard Seaver, edited by Jeannette Seaver

The Mysterious End of the Soviet Union

The Diary of Anatoly Chernyaev, 1991, National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 345 translated from the Russian by Anna Melyakova and edited by Svetlana Savranskaya

Delo GKChP [The Case of the State Committee on a State of Emergency] by Valentin Varennikov

Chekhov: Behind the Charm

Anton Chekhov: A Brother’s Memoir by Mikhail Chekhov, translated from the Russian by Eugene Alper

Memories of Chekhov: Accounts of the Writer from his Family, Friends and Contemporaries edited and translated from the Russian by Peter Sekirin

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

Louis Begley’s books include Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters and the novel Wartime Lies. His eleventh novel, Killer Come Hither, will be published in April 2015.

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. (August 2014)

T.H. Breen is William Smith Mason Professor of American History at Northwestern. His most recent book is American Insurgents, American Patriots: The Revolution of the People.
 (July 2013)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Arlene Croce, the dance critic for The New Yorker between 1973 and 1998, is the author of The Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers Book.
 (April 2012)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Jonathan Freedland is Executive Editor for Opinion at The Guardian, where he also writes a weekly column. In 2014 he was awarded the Orwell Special Prize for journalism.

 (August 2014)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His most recent book is The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth.
 (November 2013)

Günter Grass, a recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, is a novelist, poet, playwright, sculptor, and artist. (April 2012)

Giles Harvey is on the editorial staff at The New Yorker. His fiction has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize.
 (May 2012)

Michael Ignatieff is the Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics. (July 2014)

Ian Jack was the editor of the Independent on Sunday and of Granta. The author most recently of The Country Formerly Known as Great Britain, he now writes a column for the Guardian.

Amy Knight is a former Woodrow Wilson fellow. Her books include Who Killed Kirov: The Kremlin’s Greatest Mystery, Spies Without Cloaks: The KGB’s Successors, and How the Cold War Began: The Igor Gouzenko Affair and the Hunt for Soviet Spies.

Hermione Lee is President of Wolfson College, Oxford, and the author of biographies of Virginia Woolf and Edith Wharton. Her biography of Penelope Fitzgerald will be published later in 2014.
 (May 2014)

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Alison Lurie is Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of two collections of essays on children’s literature, Don’t Tell the Grownups and Boys and Girls Forever, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.


Breon Mitchell is Professor of Germanic Studies and Comparative Literature at Indiana University and Director of its Lilly Library.
 (April 2012)

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Max Rodenbeck is The Economist’s Mideast Correspondent. He lives in Cairo. (May 2013)

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.

John Paul Stevens served as a Supreme Court Justice between 1975 and 2010. Five Chiefs, his memoir of the Supreme Court, was published last year. (August 2013)

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair!
 (January 2014)

Edmund White has written biographies of Jean Genet, Marcel Proust, and Arthur Rimbaud. He has also written several novels; the most recent is Jack Holmes and His Friend: A Novel. He teaches creative writing at Princeton. His book States of Desire Revisited: Travels in Gay America will be published in September 2014.