Contents


Partial Disclosure

No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the US Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald

The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man by Luke Harding

United States of Secrets a Frontline documentary (part one produced and directed by Michael Kirk; part two produced by Martin Smith)

The NSA Report: Liberty and Security in a Changing World by the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies: Richard A. Clarke, Michael J. Morell, Geoffrey R. Stone, Cass R. Sunstein, and Peter Swire

The CIA’s ‘Zhivago’

The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book by Peter Finn and Petra Couvée

Inside the Zhivago Storm: The Editorial Adventures of Pasternak’s Masterpiece by Paolo Mancosu

Climate: Will We Lose the Endgame?

Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of a Mysterious Continent by Gabrielle Walker

What We Know: The Reality, Risks and Response to Climate Change a report by the Climate Science Panel of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment a report by the US Global Change Research Program

Are the Authoritarians Winning?

Foreign Policy Begins at Home: The Case for Putting America’s House in Order by Richard N. Haass

Restraint: A New Foundation for US Grand Strategy by Barry R. Posen

The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race to Reinvent the State by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge

Reforming Taxation to Promote Growth and Equity a white paper by Joseph Stiglitz

Tibet Resists

Voices from Tibet: Selected Essays and Reportage by Tsering Woeser and Wang Lixiong, edited and translated from the Chinese by Violet S. Law, and with an introduction by Robert Barnett

Tibet: An Unfinished Story by Lezlee Brown Halper and Stefan Halper

A History of Modern Tibet, Volume 3: The Storm Clouds Descend, 1955–1957 by Melvyn C. Goldstein

Lust and Loss in Madrid

The Infatuations by Javier Marías, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa

In the Night of Time by Antonio Muñoz Molina, translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman

What Happened to the Arab Spring?

The Second Arab Awakening: And the Battle for Pluralism by Marwan Muasher

The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising by Gilbert Achcar, translated from the French by G.M. Goshgarian

Contributors

Hilton Als is a staff writer for The New Yorker and the co­author, most recently, of Alice Neel: Uptown. He received the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Criticism.
 (June 2017)

David A. Bell is Sidney and Ruth Lapidus Professor in the Era of North Atlantic Revolutions at Princeton. He is the author, most recently, of The First Total War: Napoleon’s Europe and the Making of Warfare as We Know It.
 (July 2014)

Henri Cole’s most recent collection of poems, Nothing to Declare, was published earlier this year. (November 2015)

Steve Coll is Dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of ­Journalism. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001.


 (June 2016)

Samuel Freeman is the Avalon Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Philosophy and of Law at the University of Pennsylvania. His book Liberalism, Economic Justice, and the Difference Principle, a collection of recent essays, will be published next year. (March 2017)

Jerome Groopman iis the Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chief of Experimental Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and a staff writer at The New Yorker. He is the coauthor, with Pamela Hartzband, of Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You. 
(December 2017)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. (July 2017)

Gregory Hays is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Virginia. (June 2017)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror.
 (April 2017)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. He has ­reported for The New York Review from, among other places, ­Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.
 (May 2017)

Adam Kirsch is a poet and critic. His most recent book is The Global Novel: Writing the World in the 21st Century. (June 2017)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (July 2016)

Gideon Lewis-Kraus is the author of A Sense of 
Direction: Pilgrimage for the Restless and the Hopeful. He was the coeditor, with Arnold Eisen, of Philip Rieff’s Sacred Order/Social Order III. (January 2015)

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org, the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury, and the author, most recently, of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. (February 2017)

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most ­recently, The War That Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters.
 (October 2016)

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Nathaniel is the author of Odds Against Tomorrow and The Mayor’s Tongue. His novel King Zeno will be published in January. (October 2017)

Malise Ruthven’s books include Islam in the World, Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning, and Encounters with Islam: On Religion, Politics and Modernity. (June 2017)

Michael Scammell is the author of biographies of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Arthur Koestler, and has translated many books from Russian. He is now working on a memoir. (April 2016)

Zadie Smith’s new novel, Swing Time, was published in November. (December 2016)

James Surowiecki is a staff writer at The New Yorker, where he writes “The Financial Page.” (September 2016)

Wisława Szymborska (1923–2012) won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1996.

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is the novel House of Names. (July 2017)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)