Contents


Sublime, Exhilarating del Sarto

Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, June 23–September 13, 2015; and the Frick Collection, New York City, October 7, 2015–January 10, 2016

Inside the Emperors’ Clothes

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome by Mary Beard

Dynasty: The Rise and Fall of the House of Caesar by Tom Holland

Néron en Occident: Une figure de l’histoire by Donatien Grau

Hanging Out with Hitler

MAS: The Modern Architecture Symposia, 1962–1966: A Critical Edition edited by Rosemarie Haag Bletter and Joan Ockman, with Nancy Eklund Later

Hitler at Home by Despina Stratigakos

Speer: Hitler’s Architect by Martin Kitchen

The Meaning of Mahler

Gustav Mahler by Bruno Walter, with a biographical essay by Ernst Křenek, and an introduction by Erik Ryding

Gustav Mahler’s Symphonic Landscapes by Thomas Peattie

Mahler’s Symphonic Sonatas by Seth Monahan

Finding a Lost Ireland

The Dirty Dust/Cré na Cille by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated from the Irish by Alan Titley

The Key/An Eochair by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated from the Irish by Louis de Paor and Lochlainn Ó Tuairisg

Languages of the Night: Minor Languages and the Literary Imagination in Twentieth-Century Ireland and Europe by Barry McCrea

Contributors

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His new book, 
The Crucible of Islam, is published in April. (April 2017)

Ian Burumais a Professor at Bard and the author of many books about Japan. His latest book is Their Promised Land: My Grandparents in Love and War. (May 2017)

Leo Carey is a Senior Editor at The New Yorker. (November 2016)

Drew Gilpin Faust is the President and the Lincoln Professor of History at Harvard. She is the author, most recently, of This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War. Her essay in this issue is drawn from a speech she delivered in November at Duke to commemorate the one-hundredth birthday of the late historian John Hope Franklin.
 (December 2015)

Martin Filler is the author, most recently, of Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II: From Le Corbusier to Rem Koolhaas, a collection of his writing on architecture in these pages. (March 2017)

Jonathan Galassi’s most recent books are Muse, a novel, and Left-Handed, a volume of poems. (May 2017)

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein’s latest book is Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away. She is a recipient of this year’s National Humanities Medal and will be a Visiting Professor at New York ­University in 2016.
 (December 2015)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror.
 (April 2017)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (July 2016)

Michael Massing, a former Executive Editor of The Columbia Journalism Review, frequently writes about the press.
 (January 2016)

Aryeh Neier is President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. He was for twelve years the Executive Director of ­Human Rights Watch.


Andrew O’Hagan’s new novel, The Illuminations, has just been published. (June 2015)

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist with The Irish Times and the Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His book on George Bernard Shaw, Judging Shaw, will be published in the fall. (April 2017)

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction. A version of his essay in this issue will appear in Drawn from Life: Selected Essays of Michel de Montaigne, which will be published by Notting Hill Editions in November.
 (November 2016)

Darryl Pinckney’s latest book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (April 2017)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

David J. Rothman is Bernard Schoenberg Professor of Social Medicine and History at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons and president of the Institute on Medicine as a Professor.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her new book, The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney, will be published in October.
 (May 2017)

George Soros is chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. (November 2016)

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. His latest book is The Ethics of Influence: Government in the Age of Behavorial Science.
 (November 2016)

Colm Tóibín is Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His new novel, House of Names, will be published in May. (May 2017)

Jenny Uglow’s most recent book is The Pinecone: The Story of Sarah Losh.
 (April 2014)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festchrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)

Christopher de Bellaigue’s latest book, Islamic Enlightenment, will be published in April. (March 2017)