Contents


Federalists on Broadway

Hamilton: An American Musical book, music, and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda

War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel That Stunned the Nation by John Sedgwick

In the Sculptor’s Studio

Rodin: The Laboratory of Creation

Rodin by Raphaël Masson and Véronique Mattiussi, translated from the French by Deke Dusinberre, with a foreword by Jacques Vilain, revised and reissued on the occasion of the reopening of the Musée Rodin

Picasso Sculpture

Parking the Big Money

The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens by Gabriel Zucman, translated from the French by Teresa Lavender Fagan, with a foreword by Thomas Piketty

The Price We Pay a film directed by Harold Crooks, inspired by Brigitte Alepin’s 2010 book La Crise fiscale qui vient (The Coming Fiscal Crisis)

Contributors

Joan Acocella is a staff writer for The New Yorker. Her most recent book is Twenty-eight Artists and Two Saints. She is writing a ­biography of Mikhail Baryshnikov. (May 2018)


Charles Baxter is the Edelstein-Keller Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Minnesota. His latest book is There’s Something I Want You to Do: Stories. (April 2018)

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. His most recent book is Engines of Liberty: How Citizen Movements Succeed. 
(September 2018)

Steve Coll is Dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of ­Journalism. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001.


 (June 2016)

Andrew Davis’s books of poems include Craft and Bathysphere. His current project is the long poem “Impluvium.”
 (January 2016)

John Edwards is a Research Fellow in Spanish at Oxford. His books include The Spain of the Catholic Monarchs 1474–1520, Ferdinand and Isabella, and The Inquisitors.


(January 2016)

T.S. Eliot (1888–1965) was a poet, essayist, and editor. His poems in this issue are drawn from The Poems of T.S. Eliot: Collected and Uncollected Poems, which has just been published in the UK by Faber and Faber and in the US by Johns Hopkins University Press.
 (January 2016)

R. J. W. Evans is a Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of History Emeritus at Oxford. He is the author of Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs: Central Europe, c. 1683–1867, among other books. (March 2017)

Masha Gessen is the author of The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction in 2017. She is a staff writer at The New Yorker. (February 2018)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and ­Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His essay collection Near-Death ­Experiences…and Others will be published in June. (April 2018)

Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard. His most recent book is The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve. (May 2018)

Sarah Helm, the former Middle East Correspondent of The Independent, is the author, most recently, of Ravensbrück: Life and Death in Hitler’s Concentration Camp for Women. (January 2018)

Adam Kirsch is a poet and critic. His selection of Lionel Trilling’s letters, Life in Culture, will be published in September. (June 2018)

Osip Mandelstam (1891–1938) was persecuted for his poetry and died in a transit camp near Vladivostok, Russia. His poem in this issue is drawn from a new translation, Voronezh Notebooks, to be published by New York Review Books in January. (January 2016)

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 
at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His most recent book is On Betrayal. (March 2018)

Michael Massing, a former executive editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, is the author of Fatal Discord: Erasmus, Luther, and the Fight for the Western Mind. (February 2018)

John Nathan is Takashima Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His books include Mishima: A Biography, Sony: The Private Life, and a memoir, Living Carelessly in Tokyo and Elsewhere. His latest book, Soseki: Modern Japan’s Greatest Novelist, was published in May. (August 2018)

Jay Neugeboren is the author of twenty-two books of fiction and nonfiction, including the memoir Imagining Robert: My Brother, Madness, and Survival and, most recently, the novel Max Baer and the Star of David. (January 2017)

Geoffrey O’Brien’s books include The Phantom Empire: Movies in the Mind of the 20th Century, Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012, and, most recently, the poetry collection The Blue Hill. (August 2018)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Jed Perl’s latest book is the first volume of his biography of Alexander Calder, The Conquest of Time.
 (August 2018)

Norman Rush’s most recent novel is Subtle Bodies. (April 2017)

Willibald Sauerländer is a former Director of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich. His latest book is Manet Paints Monet: A Summer in Argenteuil. (May 2016)

Allen Shawn is a composer who teaches composition and music history at Bennington. He is the author, most recently, of Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician.
 (January 2016)

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard and the editor of Can It Happen Here?, a new volume of essays on authoritarianism in America. (June 2018)

Garry Wills, whose most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters, is the 2018 commencement speaker at Zaytuna College, the first accredited Muslim campus in America. (June 2018)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)